Intel® Edison Board User Guide

Published on June 23 , 2017

Introduction

This user guide describes the steps to assemble your board, flash the OS image, and connect your board to a Wi-Fi* network. A few integrated development environments are suggested.

Follow the link to the steps described in this guide and read their descriptions below:

Assembling and connecting your board Follow the guidelines to attach your Intel® Edison module to an Arduino* expansion board and Intel® Edison mini breakout board.
Installing drivers and software Download and install the drivers required to connect the host computer to your board. Download and install the setup tool to flash the OS image to your board and set up the security.
Installation and setup with the setup tool If the operating system on the host computer is linux*, 64-bit Windows* or macOS*, you can use the setup tool (available on the Intel® Edison board downloads page) to install the drivers (for Window* only), flash your board with the latest version of the OS image, establish a secure connection, and connect your board to the Wi-Fi* network.
Flashing the OS image Learn how to flash the OS image on your Intel® Edison board. The OS image is the operating system on your board that allows the use of Wi-Fi*, Bluetooth®, analog and digital controls, and other functions. Always keep your OS image up-to-date to ensure the best stability and performance for your board. As an alternative to manually flashing your board, you can use the setup tool (available on the Intel® Edison board downloads page) to install the drivers (Window*), flash your board with the latest version of the OS image, enable the security, and set up the connection to a Wi-Fi* network.
Setting up a serial terminal Follow the steps to set up a serial terminal to communicate with your Intel® Edison board and type the commands that give you the ability to set a password for your board, connect your board to a Wi-Fi* network, check the OS image version, or fetch the latest version of OS image and flash your board with it, for example.
Connecting to a network Follow the steps to set up a network access to your Intel® Edison board and obtain an IP address for your board.
Choosing your Integrated Development Environment (IDE) Find out about the available integrated development environments (IDE), install the IDE of your choice and start creating projects.

Assembling and Connecting your Board

This section of the user guide describes the box contents and physical material requirements for the Arduino* expansion board and Intel® Edison mini breakout board, and how to assemble them. The following table describes the content of the section with the link to each page.

Select the section that corresponds to the kit you have purchased:

Arduino* Expansion Board Kit This page lists the content of the Arduino* expansion board kit, and the additional cables that are required to use the board.
Assembling Arduino* Expansion Board Follow the steps to assemble the Arduino* expansion board.
Mini Breakout Board Kit This page lists the content of the mini breakout board kit, and the additional cables that are required to use the board.
Assembling the Mini Breakout Board Follow the steps to assemble the mini breakout kit.
Board Connectors This page describes the various USB ports on the Arduino* expansion board, and how to use them to flash the OS image, establish serial communications, or attach USB peripherals to your board. It also covers the use of the barrek connector to power your board with an external power supply.
How do you Know when the Board is Ready? This page provides some guidance when you are using your board for the first time.

Arduino* Expansion Board Kit

Inside the Intel® Edison Kit for Arduino* Box

 Intel® Edison compute module
Refer to the Product Brief for the specs of the Intel® Edison compute module.

 Arduino* expansion board Arduino* expansion board is hardware pin-compatible with Arduino* Uno R3 shields. Refer to the Intel® Edison Kit for Arduino* Hardware Guide.

 Assembly hardware

  • Small hex nuts (x 2) - For securing the Intel® Edison compute module to the expansion board.
  • Screws (x 4) & plastic spacers (x 4) - To keep the expansion board stable and lifted off of surfaces that may cause a short circuit.

Additional Cables Required

 Micro-B USB to Standard Type-A USB cables (x 2)
These common micro-B to standard Type-A USB cables are used for data transfer and charging mobile phones and other consumer electronics. You will need two micro-B to standard Type-A USB cables during initial development setup.

 Direct current (DC) power supply rated as follow:

  • 7-15 V DC
  • At least 1500 mA
  • The center/inner pin is the positive pole

Do you need an external power supply?

An external power supply is the preferred way of powering the Intel® Edison board. However, you can power your board over USB if you do not have an external power supply. Powering your board in this fashion may result in unpredictable behavior from your board, especially when using Wi-Fi* or driving motors. For details, see the Powering your board over USB section.

Assembling Arduino* Expansion Board

Check the list of requirements and follow the steps below to assemble the Intel® Edison module with the Arduino* expansion board.

Note: The expansion board is stored in a static shield bag as it is prone to damage caused by electrostatic discharge (ESD). When not working with the assembled board, or when outside protected areas, make sure to enclose the device back in its static shield bag. When assembling the board, make sure to comply with the ESD handling protection rules.

Requirements

  • Intel® Edison module
    Refer to Intel® Edison Compute Module Datasheet.
  • Arduino expansion board
    Refer to the Intel® Arduino* Expansion Board Hardware Guide.
  • Two Micro B to Type A USB cables
  • Spacer bars and screws included in the packaging, including two screws to fasten the module to the expansion board and four sets of screws and plastic spacers.
  • A direct current (DC) power supply. Your power supply should be rated as follow
    • 7-15 V DC
    • At least 1500 mA
    • The center/inner pin should be the positive pole of the power supply

Note: An external power supply is the preferred way of powering the Intel® Edison board. However, you can power your board over USB if you do not have an external power supply. Powering your board in this fashion may result in unpredictable behavior from your board, especially when using Wi-Fi* or driving motors. For details, see the Powering your board over USB section.

Assembling your board

Attach your Intel® Edison module to your expansion board:

  1. Place the Intel® Edison module within the white outline on your expansion board, lining up the holes on the module with the screws on the expansion board.
  2. Press down on the module just below the words What will you make? until you feel a snap.

    Caution: Unless you make sure your board is seated properly, it may not work or turn on at all. When you turn the attached module and expansion board on their side, both pieces should fit evenly and sit in parallel with each other.
  3. Use the two hex nuts (included in the package) to secure the module to the expansion board.
  4. Insert a screw in one of the four corner holes on the expansion board. Twist and tighten one of the white plastic spacers onto the screw. The spacer should be on the bottom of the expansion board, acting as one of four legs to keep the board off the horizontal surface of your work table.
  5. Repeat for the other three corner spacers.
  6. Once fully assembled, these four spacers add stability to the expansion board and help avoid accidental short circuits.

Connect the board to your system

  1. Plug in the 7-15 V DC power supply.
  2. A green LED should light up on the expansion board. If it doesn't, check your connection.
  3. Find the microswitch in between the USB ports on the expansion board. Switch the microswitch down towards the micro-USB ports, if it isn't already.
  4. Plug in one of the micro-USB cables to the middle USB connector on the expansion board.
  5. Plug in the other end of the USB cable to your computer. Wait for approximately one minute for the board to boot up.
    See the section How do you know when the board is ready?
  6. Plug in your second USB cable to the edge USB connector on the board.
  7. Plug the other end of the USB cable in to your computer. Your board is now set up and connected.

Mini Breakout Board Kit

Verify what the Intel® Edison mini breakout board kit includes and the additional material you will need.

Inside the Intel® Edison Breakout Board Kit Box

 Intel® Edison compute module
Refer to the Product Brief for the specs of the Intel® Edison compute module.

 Mini breakout board
Refer to Intel® Edison Breakout Board Hardware Guide section.

 Small hex nuts (x 2)
For securing the Intel® Edison compute module to the mini breakout board.

Additional Cables Required

 Micro-B USB to Standard Type-A USB cables (x 2)
These common micro USB cables are used for data transfer and power supply. You will need two micro USB to standard type-A cables during initial development setup.

Assembling the Mini Breakout Board

Check the list of requirements and follow the steps below to assemble the Intel® Edison module with the mini breakout expansion board.

Note: The mini breakout board is stored in a static shield bag as it is prone to damage caused by electrostatic discharge (ESD). When not working with the assembled board, or when outside protected areas, make sure to enclose the device back in its static shield bag. When assembling the board, make sure to comply with the ESD handling protection rules.

Requirements

  • Intel® Edison module
  • Intel® Edison mini breakout expansion board
  • Two Micro B to Type-A USB cables
  • Two screws to fasten the module to the expansion board

Note that the breakout board has two micro USB ports:

  • The top port is used to create a terminal connection by serial over USB only.
  • The bottom port is for power and USB communication.

For details, see the Intel® Edison Breakout Board Hardware Guide.

Assembling your board

To assemble your Intel® Edison board:

  1. Place the Intel® Edison module on the breakout board, lining up the holes on the module with the screws on the breakout board. Press down on the module at the upper left corner and just below the words What will you make? until you feel it click into place.

    Caution: Unless you make sure your board is seated properly, it may not work or turn on at all. When you turn the attached module and expansion board on their side, both pieces should fit evenly and sit in parallel with each other.

  2. Use the two hex nuts to secure the module to the expansion board. Hand-tighten the hex nuts onto the two screws that protrude through the module.
  3. Plug in one of the micro-USB cables to the bottom USB connector on the expansion board. Plug in the other end of the USB cable to your computer. A green light should light up on the expansion board. If it doesn’t, check your connection.
  4. Wait a moment for the board to boot up.
    See the section How do you know when the board is ready?
  5. Plug in your second USB cable to the top USB connector on the board. plug in the other end of the USB cable to your computer.

    Your board is now set up and connected.

Board Connectors

The Intel® Edison board provides a wide range of functionality for communicating with your board, uploading your code, updating the board OS image, and more. Refer to the image below for an overview of the various connectors on your board and what each is used for.

  1. Barrel connector for the external power supply: This connector is used for powering your board with an external power supply. For steps, see Powering your Board.
  2. Standard Type-A USB port: This port is for regular connections of USB peripherals, such as mice, keyboards, and more. See Attaching USB Peripherals to your Board.
  3. Microswitch: You can switch between USB host mode and USB device mode using the microswitch.
    • Device mode: In device mode, you can use your board as a computer peripheral using a micro-USB cable. In device mode, you can program the board over USB, mount the on-board flash memory like a disk drive. For steps to connect the board as a computer peripheral, see Programming, Powering, and Writing to the On-board Flash Memory.
    • Host mode: In host mode, you can plug USB peripherals with a standard-sized USB cable (such as mice, keyboards, and the like) in to the board. For steps, see Attaching USB Peripherals to your Board.
  4. Middle USB port (Micro-B type): This port is used for the following:
  5. Edge port (Micro-B Type): This port is used to create a terminal connection by serial over USB only. See Establishing Serial Communications with your Board.

Programming, Powering, and Writing to the On-board Flash Memory

You can use the middle micro type-B USB port on the board for the following:

  • 5 V power supply
  • Programming your board using the Arduino IDE
  • Programming your board using the Intel® XDK or Intel® System Studio IoT Edition via Ethernet over USB (not Wi-Fi*)
  • Writing to the on-board flash memory from your computer

When powering your board using the micro type-B USB port, keep in mind the following:

  • Certain USB ports on your system might not be able to provide enough power to the board. This will ultimately result in some very unpredictable behavior from the board, especially when using Wi-Fi* or driving motors. To avoid this behavior, power your board using an external power supply.
  • If you are connecting your board to a laptop, plug in your laptop's power supply to ensure that your board has enough power.
  1. Find the microswitch in between the USB ports on the expansion board. Switch the microswitch down towards the micro type-B USB ports.
  2. Plug in a micro type-B USB cable to the middle USB connector on the expansion board.
  3. A green LED should light up on the expansion board. If it doesn't, check your connection.
  4. Wait one minute for the board to finish booting up.

How do you know when the board is ready?

Refer to How do you know when your board is ready?

Establishing Serial Communications with your Board

You can send serial commands to your board via Terminal or PuTTY using the edge micro-type B USB port. You can use these commands to flash the OS image, configure Wi-Fi settings, or identify the IP address of your board. See the section Setting up a Serial Terminal.

Attaching USB Peripherals to your Board

Use the standard Type-A USB port in USB host mode to allow the Intel® Edison board to accept USB peripherals, such as mice, keyboards, and more.

  1. Find the microswitch in between the USB ports on the expansion board. Switch the microswitch up towards the standard-sized USB port.
  2. Plug in the DC power supply to the barrel connector. The USB host mode requires the use of an external power adapter.
  3. Plug a USB peripheral with a standard-sized USB connector in to the standard type-A USB port above the microswitch on the expansion board.

Powering your Board

To ensure that you have access to more power-intensive features such as Wi-Fi*, a servo motor, or an Arduino shield, use an external direct current (DC) power supply to power your board. An external power supply is the preferred way of powering the Intel® Edison board. However, you can power your board over the micro type-B USB if you do not have an external power supply. For details, see Programming, powering, and writing to the on-board flash memory.

The details about the power supply are given in the section describing Arduino* expansion board kit content and additional cables required.

Proceed as follows to power your board:

  1. Plug in the DC power supply to the barrel connector on your board.
  2. A green LED should light up on the expansion board. If it doesn't, check your connection.
  3. Wait one minute for the board to finish booting up.

How do you Know when the Board is Ready?

You will know that your board is fully initialized when your computer mounts a new drive (much like inserting a SD card into your computer). If you do not see a new drive, or if the LED light (DS1 on the Arduino expansion board) is occasionally blinking, check the connection of your power supply.

The Intel® Edison board needs approximately one minute to go through the entire Linux* startup process. There is no on-board LED to indicate whether or not the Intel® Edison board is fully initialized. However, you can watch the full boot up sequence (whether for fun or for debugging purposes) by creating a serial communication session with your board. Steps to do so are included in Setting up a serial terminal later in this guide.

If you do not see a new drive, and you are powering the board by USB, it is likely that the board is not getting enough power from the USB port. Plug in your computer AC adapter, try a different USB port on your computer, or try using a USB hub that has its own power supply.

Installing Drivers and Software

This section of the user guide covers the installation of the drivers that are required for Windows*, Linux* and macOS* operating systems, the installation and use of the Intel® Edison board configuration tool or setup tool, and the choice of an integrated development environment (IDE).

The following table provides the links and descriptions of the topics covered in this section.

Installation and setup with the setup tool If your host operating system is Linux*, macOS*, or 64-bit Windows*, you can download, install and run the setup tool to successively install the drivers (for Window* only), flash the OS image to your board, enable the security and connect your board to the Wi-Fi* network.
Installing drivers for your board If your host operating system is Windows*, install the required drivers to communicate with your board. You can use the standalone driver installer unless your are using the setup tool. If your host operating system is macOS* or Linux*, ensure to have the appropriate FTDI drivers installed.
Choosing your integrated development environment (IDE) Choose the IDE based on the programming language you want to use to program your board.

Installation and Setup with the Setup Tool

The setup tool or Intel® Edison Board Configuration Tool is a utility that allows you to quickly:

  • Install the required drivers if your host operating system is Windows*.
  • Flash the OS image to your board.
  • Enable SSH communication with your board by setting up a password for your board.
  • Connect your board to your Wi-Fi* network.

Download, Install the Setup Tool and Flash your Board

The following steps target the installation and use or Intel® Edison Board Configuration Tool with Windows* host operating system. The steps are similar for Linux* and macOS* host operating systems but the file names and types are different. Also, the first step to install the drivers is not included in the setup tool for Linux* and macOS*.

  1. Download the setup tool from the Intel® Edison board downloads page.
  2. Extract the files and double-click on the .EXE file to launch the installation of the setup tool.

    Note: The installation requires administrative rights. Confirm that you allow the program to make changes to your computer by selecting Yes when prompted with the question "Do you want to allow the following program to make changes to your computer?"

  3. Run the setup tool. Follow the setup tool on-screen instructions, clicking Next where needed. If your host operating system is Windows*, select Install Drivers on the Set up options page.
  4. Continue following the on-screen options to install your drivers until you are returned to the Set up options page.
    Click Flash Firmware.
  5. The setup tool is programmed to fetch and download the previous version of Edison Image file, now superseded with a patched version. As a consequence, the Flash Firmware program requires some redirection to the latest image file version that you first need to download and extract.Go to Intel® Edison downloads page, download the latest Poky* image ZIP file and extract the files. Select the option Use existing image, located at: and provide the path to the relevant image file, for example FlashEdison.js with Windows* operating system.
  6. The setup tool will prompt you to connect the board to your computer and reset the board. When requested by the setup tool, plug in your board to your computer using the device mode cable so the flashing of the OS image can start. The entire flashing process may take up to 10 minutes.
    On the Arduino* expansion board: The microswitch is toggled towards the two micro type-B USB ports. Plug in a USB cable with a micro-B type connector into the top micro type-B USB port, and plug the other end of the cable into your computer.

    On the mini breakout board: Plug in a USB cable with a micro-B type connector into the top micro type-B USB port, and plug the other end of the cable into your computer.
  7. When the flashing of the OS image is complete, select the option Enable Security that will prompt you to set a name and password for the board.

The troubleshooting section in each of the getting started with Intel® Edison guides addresses the issue of the setup tool not detecting your board. See for example the Troubleshooting and Tips section of the Get started with Intel® Edison Development board on Window* 64-bit.

You can rerun the setup tool to update the OS image of your board, reinstall the drivers, or set a new password for your board.

Set a Password and Enable SSH

You must enable SSH on the Wi-Fi* interface of the Intel® Edison board in order to program your board without using micro type-B USB cables to connect the board to your computer. Setting up a device password on an Intel® Edison board will enable SSH.

  1. On the Set up options page of the setup tool, click Enable Security.
  2. You can set a custom name for your Intel® Edison board. This name will be detected by the integrated development environment you use to program your board. A unique device name helps to identify your board if there are multiple boards nearby. Type a name for your board in the field, then click Set name. Once you see the confirmation message, click Next.
  3. Type a password for your board, then click Set password. Once you see the confirmation message, click Next.

Connect your Board to your Wi-Fi* Network

  1. On the Set up options page of the setup tool, click Connect Wi-Fi. Wait for up to 1 minute as your computer scans for available Wi-Fi* networks.
  2. From the Detected networks drop-down list, select your network.
  3. From the Security drop-down list, select the network security type.
  4. Provide your Wi-Fi* login and password information, then click Connect to connect to your Wi-Fi network.

Once you have finished with the setup tool you can close it.

Note: The setup tool is not just for initial setup. If you want to re-flash or update the OS image on your Intel® Edison board in the future, rerun the setup tool and change the device name or password, or connect your board to Wi-Fi*.

Installing Drivers for your Board

Follow these steps to install the required drivers for your Intel® Edison board on your computer.

Note: If your host operating system is macOS* or Linux*, the appropriate FTDI drivers should already be installed. If they are not, install them from the FTDI page.

If your host operating system is 64-bit Windows*, you can run the setup tool for the Intel® Edison board instead of installing the drivers manually. The setup tool lets you install the necessary drivers and update your board OS image. See Installation and Setup with the Setup Tool.

The Intel® Edison board drivers for Windows* include several USB drivers in one installer package. These drivers enable important features, such as:

  • Composite Device Class (CDC) for programming the board via the Arduino* IDE
  • Remote Network Driver Interface Spec (RNDIS) for Ethernet over USB
  • Device Firmware Upgrade (DFU) for updating firmware on devices

Installing the USB drivers

  1. Download the Windows* standalone driver 1.2.1 and run it.
  2. Click Next.
  3. Click I Agree.
  4. Click Next.
  5. Click Install..
  6. Click OK.
  7. Click Finish.
  8. Unplug the micro USB cable from the middle micro USB port, then plug it back in.

Installing the FTDI Drivers with Windows* Host Operating System

  1. Download the Windows* setup executable.
  2. Right-click the file and select Run as administrator.
  3. Follow the on-screen instructions to install the drivers, then reboot your system.
  4. Navigate to the Device Manager and check for an entry called USB Serial Port (not Intel Edison Virtual Com Port). Make a note of the COM#, as highlighted below; you'll need this information to create a serial communication session with your board.

Installing the FTDI Drivers with Linux* Host Operating System

  1. Download the Linux* setup executable.
  2. Confirm that you want to save the file.
  3. Go to the Downloads repository and extract the files
    $ cd ~/Downloads
    $ ls
    $ tar -xvzf libftd2xx-x86-64-<Version-Nmuber>.tgz
  4. Go to the page listing all the installation guide. Select and open the Linux Driver Installation Guide.
  5. Follow the instructions using the ~/Downloads/release path as directory for the FTDI driver files.

Installing your integrated development environment (IDEs)

Choose and install the integrated development environment (IDE) to program your Intel® Edison board.

Which programming language will you use?

The IDE you use to program your board depends on the programming language you want to develop in. The choices are:

  • Arduino*: Arduino is an easy-to-learn, open source C++-based programming environment. It is convenient for quickly adding sensors, taking advantage of the sensor code that is already available. Since the Intel® Edison board is Arduino-pin compatible, there are also plenty of shields to choose from. The Arduino IDE is the application of choice for programming with Arduino. See Installing the Arduino IDE.
  • JavaScript* and Node.js*: These languages are great for creating web interfaces and to make devices talk to one another. They also work well in cloud connectivity. We provide the Intel® XDK to program in JavaScript and Node.js. It comes with easy-to-use project templates to jumpstart your IoT projects. See Installing the Intel® XDK.
  • C++: Alternatively, using C++ tends to be very powerful, giving you full control of the system while simultaneously taking advantage of a lot of available libraries.
  • Java*: Java is a well-known and widely-supported object-oriented language that offers many useful libraries.

Flashing your Board

This section covers the flashing of Intel® Edison compute module mated on the Arduino* expansion board, or the mini breakout board with the latest Yocto* poky image.

The Yocto* Poky image (formerly called firmware) is the board operating system that allows for example the use of Wi-Fi*, Bluetooth®, analog and digital controls.

If your host operating system is Linux*, macOS* or 64-bit Windows*, the recommended method to flash the OS image is to download and run the setup tool for the Intel® Edison board. Simply follow the on-screen prompts to flash your board with the latest image for the Intel® Edison board.

The following pages explain how to manually flash the Yocto* Poky image to your board depending on the host operating system, as an alternative to using the setup tool:

Flashing your firmware manually

This section contains steps to update (flash) the firmware on your Intel® Edison board using the manual process. The firmware is your board's operating system, and also allows for use of Wi-Fi*, Bluetooth*, analog and digital controls, and other functions. It's important to keep your firmware up-to-date to ensure the best stability and performance for your board.

If you have a host system with 64-bit Windows* or macOS*, the setup tool for the Intel® Edison board is the preferred method of flashing your board's firmware. Simply follow the onscreen prompts to flash your board. For steps for your host system, see the steps for Windows or Mac. If you run into difficulties, need to revert changes, or have other issues, you can use the manual process described in this section.

Flashing the OS Image on your Board with Linux*

Requirement

You have assembled your Arduino* expansion board or your mini breakout expansion board, and you are familiar with how to connect your board to your host system.

Flashing your board

  1. Open a Terminal window. Install dfu-util, which is an open source program that implements the USB DFU (USB Device Firmware Upgrade) protocol:
    sudo apt-get install dfu-util
    
  2. Download the pre-built Ref IoT OS complete image for your board. The latest version is available on the main downloads page
  3. Create a directory for Edison image (named DIRECTORY here):
    $ mkdir DIRECTORY
    $ cd DIRECTORY/
    $ mkdir Image
    
  4. Go to the Downloads directory and move the image package to the newly created Image directory
    $ cd ~/Downloads
    ~ mv iot-devkit-prof-dev-image-edison-20160606-patch.zip ~/DIRECTORY/Image
    
  5. Move to the directory for the Edison image
    $ cd ~/DIRECTORY/Image
    
  6. Extract the contents of the image files.
    $ unzip iot-devkit-prof-dev-image-edison-20160606-patch.zip
    
  7. Stay in the directory where you extracted the image files.
  8. To flash your board, enter the command:
    ./flashall.sh
    
  9. To flash your board, enter the command:

Flashing the OS Image on your Board with macOS*

Requirement

You have assembled your Arduino* expansion board or your mini breakout expansion board, and you are familiar with how to connect your board to your host system.

Flashing your board

  1. Open a Terminal window and install Homebrew by entering the command:
    ruby -e "$(curl -fsSL https://raw.githubusercontent.com/Homebrew/install/master/install)"
    
  2. Install dfu-util, coreutils, and gnu-getopt by entering the command:
    brew install dfu-util coreutils gnu-getopt
    Note: The steps 1 and 2 apply to macOS* host operating system.
  3. Download the latest Yocto* complete image from the main Intel® Edison board downloads page.
  4. Extract the contents of the image file.
  5. In your terminal, navigate to the directory where you extracted the OS image. Note the file name and use it in the command below:
    cd ~/Downloads/<image-file-name>
    
  6. Flash your board by entering the command:
    ./flashall.sh
    
  7. Follow the on-screen prompts and plug in your board to your system to power it when requested. The script can take up to 5 minutes to complete the flashing process.

Flashing the OS Image on your Board with Windows*

Requirement

You have assembled your Arduino* expansion board or your mini breakout expansion board, and you are familiar with how to connect your board to your host system.

Flashing your Board

  1. Download the pre-built Yocto* complete image for your board. You can find the most recent version available on the main downloads page.
  2. Extract the contents of the image file.
  3. Download the latest copy of dfu-util.exe and libusb-1.0.dll from the dfu-util site. Place these files in the same folder as the image files.
  4. Open a new command window by clicking Start. Type cmd and press Enter.
  5. Navigate to the folder you extracted the image .zip file using the cd command, then enter the command:
    flashall.bat
    
  6. Follow the on-screen prompts and plug in your board to your system to power it when requested. The script can take up to 5 minutes to complete the flashing process.

Setting up a Serial Terminal

The serial terminal is used to communicate with your Intel® Edison board. Though serial communication is not strictly required to begin programming on your board, it gives you access to a wide range of functionality, such as:

  • Connecting your board to a Wi-Fi* network
  • Registering a password for your board
  • Identifying the IP address of your board
  • Checking the version of the OS image on your board

Select the link to the appropriate system for your board, and follow the steps to set up a serial terminal:

For a quick list of useful commands for communicating with your board over a serial connection, see Common commands for the Intel® Edison board.

Setting up a Serial Terminal with Linux*

Requirements

You have assembled your Arduino* expansion board or your mini breakout expansion board, installed the appropriate drivers, and flashed the OS image (formerly called firmware).

Steps to Set Up a Serial Terminal

  1. If you do not have the screen shell session manager installed, open a new Terminal window. Enter the command:
    $ sudo apt-get install screen
    If prompted, enter your password to install screen.
  2. Issue the following command to check the name of your serial connection with Intel® Edison board. In most cases the USB dev path is dev/ttyUSB0 but if you have multiple USB serial devices connected, your Intel® Edison board could be assigned ttyUSB1 or ttyUSB2.
    $ ls dev/ttyUSB*
    
  3. To connect to the board, enter the command:
    $ sudo screen /dev/ttyUSB0 115200
    where ttyUSB0 is your connected device.
    If prompted, enter your password to continue.
  4. Press Enter twice. A login screen is displayed.
  5. At the login prompt, type root and press Enter.
  6. Press Enter when prompted for a password.

You have now established a serial communication with your board. You can interact with your board by entering common Linux commands. For a summary of useful commands, see Common commands for the Intel® Edison board.

Setting up a Serial Terminal with macOS*

Requirements

You have assembled your Arduino* expansion board or your mini breakout expansion board, installed the appropriate drivers, and flashed the OS image (formerly called firmware).

Steps to Set Up a Serial Terminal

  1. Launch Spotlight by pressing Cmd + Space.
  2. Type terminal.
  3. Select the Terminal app.
  4. In the Terminal window, enter the command:
    ls /dev/cu.usbserial-*
  5. In the list of connected devices, look for a device that contains cu.usbserial. In the example above, the device name is /dev/cu.usbserial-A402YSYU.
    Note: If your device is not in the list, verify that your board is powered on and connected to your system. Select the appropriate link below:

  6. Connect to the USB serial device using the Terminal screen utility by entering the command:
    screen /dev/xx.usbserial-XXXXXXXX 115200 –L
    where /dev/xx.usbserial-XXXXXXXX is replaced by your device unique name. Using the example above, the command would be:
    screen -L /dev/cu.usbserial-A402YSYU 115200 –L
    Note: Adding –L to the command, as shown above, turns on output logging so you can see the results of your commands. To end a session in Screen type Ctrl + A and then Ctrl + K to kill the session. You will be prompted to end the session.
     
  7. At the blank screen, press Enter twice. A login screen is displayed.
  8. At the login prompt, type root and press Enter.
  9. Press Enter when prompted for a password. The following screen is displayed:

You have now established a serial communication with your board. You can interact with your board by entering common Linux commands. For a summary of useful commands, see Common commands for the Intel® Edison board.

 

Setting up a Serial Terminal with Windows*

Requirements

You have assembled your Arduino* expansion board or your mini breakout expansion board, installed the appropriate drivers, and flashed the OS image (formerly called firmware).

Set Up PuTTY

  1. Download the PuTTY terminal emulator (859 MB).
  2. Apply a right mouse-click on the putty.exe file and select Run as administrator.
  3. Configure the PuTTY menu as follows:
    • Under Connection type, select Serial.
    • In the Serial line field, enter the COM# for your board, such as COM7.
      Note: If you did not identify your COM# when setting up your board, navigate to the Device Manager and check for an entry called USB Serial Port (not Intel Edison Virtual Com Port). The COM# is displayed next to the USB Serial Port entry, as highlighted below.
    • In the Speed field, type 115200.
  4. Click Open.
  5. When you see a blank screen, press the Enter key twice. A login prompt is displayed.
  6. At the login prompt, type root and press Enter.
  7. Press Enter when prompted for a password. You should see a terminal prompt.

You have now established a serial communication with your board. You can interact with your board by entering common Linux commands. For a summary of useful commands, see Common commands for the Intel® Edison board.

Common commands for the Intel® Edison board

The following are common commands to communicate with the board in a serial communication session.

Check the OS image version on your board:

cat /etc/version

Display IP information for your board:

ifconfig

Change the name of your board:

configure_edison --name

Change the login password for your board:

configure_edison --password

Connect to a Wi-Fi* network:

configure_edison --wifi

Display a help message with additional common commands for the Intel® Edison board:

configure_edison --help

Connecting to a Network

Connecting your board to a network allows your host operating system to communicate with your board for programming and debugging purposes.

Do one of the following:

Connecting your Board Using Wi-Fi*

These are the steps to set up Wi-Fi* network access to your Intel® Edison board and obtain an IP address.

Requirements

Set up Wi-Fi*

  1. Establish a serial communication session with your board.
  2. To configure your Wi-Fi, enter the command:
    configure_edison --wifi
    If you get an error saying configure_edison: not found, you need to update your OS image, as described in the prerequisites. You can run the setup tool for the Intel® Edison board and follow the on-screen prompts to flash your board.
  3. When asked if you want to set up Wi-Fi, type Y and press Enter.
  4. Your board will scan for Wi-Fi networks for 10 seconds. The list of available networks is displayed. If you don’t see any networks, enter 0 to rescan.
  5. Choose the network you would like to connect to, type the corresponding number from the list, and press Enter. To confirm your entry, type Y and press Enter. In this example, to connect to the kafka network, enter 16.
  6. If your network requires a password or other information, enter the appropriate network credentials.
  7. The board will attempt to make a connection to the network. When you see a Done message, your board is connected to a Wi-Fi network.
  8. Note the IP address, as shown in the image above. This is your board’s IP address. Alternately, enter the command:
    ifconfig
    Note your wlan0 IP address, displayed next to inet addr.
     
  9. To verify the connectivity, ping your board from another computer on the same network using the IP address obtained above. Alternately, you can access your board by typing in its IP address into the browser of another computer on the same network.

Troubleshooting

If you are having problems connecting, try running the following commands in a serial communication session with your board:

ifconfig usb0 down
ifconfig wlan0 down
ifconfig usb0 up
ifconfig wlan0 up

You may also want to try the alternate method to set up Wi-Fi*.

 

Connecting to your Board Using Ethernet over USB

When you are in a busy or restricted network environment, you can connect to the Intel® Edison board using a micro-USB cable and a virtual Ethernet connection, known as Ethernet over USB. Below are the guidelines to connnect to your Intel® Edison board using Ethernet over USB and obtain an IP address for the board.

Ethernet over USB allows you to program your board offline. Using this method will disable the Wi-Fi* connection on your computer as long as Ethernet over USB is being used. Ethernet over USB uses the RNDIS protocol.

Windows* and Linux* host operating systems support ethernet over USB.

Requirements

  • You have assembled your Arduino* expansion board or your mini breakout expansion board, installed the appropriate drivers, and flashed the OS image (formerly called firmware).
  • The microswitch on your Intel® Edison board is toggled down towards the micro type-B USB ports.

Choose your Operating System

 

Instructions for Windows*

These are the steps to update your system network adapter configuration with a static IP address to use Ethernet over USB.

  1. Check your Network Connections:
    • In Windows 7, go to the Control Panel. Under Network and Internet, click View network status and tasks. Click Change Adapter Settings in the sidebar.
    • In Windows 8 and Windows 10, right-click the Windows Start menu button and select Network Connections.
  2. Plug the micro type-B USB cable into the micro type-B USB port closest to the middle of the board. Plug the other end of the cable in to your computer.
  3. Look for a network adapter with the label RNDIS. Right-click the network adapter, then select Properties to configure its IP address.
  4. From the list, select IPV4.
  5. Change the IP information as follows:
    • IP: 192.168.2.2
      If you get a system notification that 192.168.2.2 is taken, try any IP address from 192.168.2.1 to 192.168.2.14. Do not use 192.168.2.15.
    • Mask: 255.255.255.0

You can now ping your Intel® Edison board on address 192.168.2.15 from your computer's command line. You can also use PuTTY to SSH into the board at the same IP address.

If you are using the Intel® XDK, the IDE should automatically detect your board. Connect to your board using the IP address 192.168.2.15 to upload your programs.

If you don't see the RNDIS adapter

If you don't see an adapter called RNDIS in the steps above, you need to install RNDIS drivers, then follow the steps above to set up Ethernet over USB.

  1. Go to Device Manager. Under Other Devices you should see an entry for RNDIS.
  2. Right-click the entry, then select Properties. On the General tab, select Update driver.
  3. Click Browse my computer for driver software, then Let me pick from a list of device driver in my computer.
  4. In the list, select Network Adapters, then click Next.
  5. In the Manufacturers list on the left, select Microsoft.
  6. Select the network connection corresponding to the RNDIS gadget and install it, then continue with the steps to set up Ethernet over USB above. For more information on this issue, see the Internet of Things forum.

Instructions for Linux*

  1. Open a new Terminal window.
  2. Plug the micro type-B USB cable into the micro type-B USB port closest to the middle of the board. Plug the other end of the cable in to your computer.
  3. Use the ifconfig command to forward connections to the IP address 192.168.2.2 through the USB cable. Enter the command:
    sudo ifconfig usb0 192.168.2.2
    You may be prompted for your user password.

You can now ping your board on address 192.168.2.15 from a Terminal. You can also use Terminal to SSH into the board at the same IP address.

If you are using the Intel® XDK, the IDE should automatically detect your board. Connect to your board using the IP address 192.168.2.15 to upload your programs.

Note on Program-Erase (P/E) Cycle

The solid-state-storage program-erase (P/E) cycle describes how data is written, erased, and then rewritten to solid-state NAND flash memory cells. This is the same type of memory found in flash drives. These cycles are used to quantify the probable lifespan of the board eMMC.

Please note:
The eMMC on the Intel® Edison board has a P/E cycle threshold of 3000 per block. The P/E cycle count is incremented whenever there are write calls to that block. Here are some examples of when this occurs:

  • Flashing the board.
  • The application code writing to the eMMC.
  • The logging feature writing to the eMMC.

Avoid too many writes as it deteriorates the eMMC. Once the threshold is reached, your Intel® Edison board may no longer operate properly. For example, it may no longer boot or flash.

Resources

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Product and Performance Information

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Intel's compilers may or may not optimize to the same degree for non-Intel microprocessors for optimizations that are not unique to Intel microprocessors. These optimizations include SSE2, SSE3, and SSSE3 instruction sets and other optimizations. Intel does not guarantee the availability, functionality, or effectiveness of any optimization on microprocessors not manufactured by Intel. Microprocessor-dependent optimizations in this product are intended for use with Intel microprocessors. Certain optimizations not specific to Intel microarchitecture are reserverd for Intel microprocessors. Please refer to the applicable product User and Reference Guides for more information regarding the specific instruction sets covered by this notice.

Notice revision #20110804