Installing Intel® oneAPI Toolkits via Linux* Package Managers

Published: 07/03/2019, Last Updated: 06/12/2020

Overview of Installation Process using Package Managers

 This page provides general installation and support notes about the Intel® oneAPI Toolkits as they are distributed by Intel linux package manager repositories.

LEGAL NOTICE:  By downloading and using these packages and the included software, you agree to the terms and conditions of the software license agreements located at the End User License Agreements page.

By proceeding you acknowledge that you have read the EULA and agree to the terms and conditions of this agreement.


NOTE:  If you have an existing installation of Intel® oneAPI, you should remove your older version before installing beta07.

NOTE:  the repositories for YUM (DNF), APT, and ZYPPER are public repositories on the general Internet.  If you are on a company intranet behind a firewall you may need to set environment variables https_proxy  and http_proxy to your company's proxy server and port.  Please contact your local network or system administrators for assistance if you are unfamiliar with using proxy servers.


List of Intel® oneAPI Toolkits

The following toolkits and associated versions are available
THE REPOSITORIES ALWAYS CONTAIN
THE LATEST RELEASED VERSION

Determine which Intel® oneAPI Toolkit(s) you need.  As an example, for the oneAPI DPC++ Compiler (DPC++) you need only the package "intel-basekit".  But if you are an HPC users and you want the OpenMP offload compilers, MPI, or ICC and IFORT, and related HPC tools you will need TWO packages "intel-basekit" AND "intel-hpckit" - install the Base Kit first followed by the HPC Kit. 

The default kits are for 64bit development.  We also have 32bit development packages: which would make sense for IOT but probably are of no interest if you are an HPC developer.  So think about what you need when you make your selection. 

Don't need or want a whole Toolkit?  Maybe you are deploying binaries and only want the runtime libraries to install on a target host.  Or perhaps you need just 1 or 2 libraries and don't want the Intel compilers? Skip to Appendix1 (kits) or Appendix2 (components) as we have a way for you to search for available component packages.  Be advised that it is far easier and less error prone to install an entire Toolkit package rather than just individual components. 

We recommend installation of a full Toolkit which integrates all required runtimes and libraries.
 

Toolkit Name

Version

Meta Package Name
(64bit default)

32bit Meta Package Name
(only needed
if you want 32bit
app dev and deployment)

Intel® oneAPI Base Toolkit 2021.1-beta07
intel-basekit
intel-basekit-32bit
Intel® oneAPI HPC Toolkit 2021.1-beta07
intel-hpckit
intel-hpckit-32bit
Intel® oneAPI IoT Toolkit 2021.1-beta07
intel-iotkit
intel-iotkit-32bit
Intel® oneAPI DL Framework Developer Toolkit 2021.1-beta07
 intel-dlfdkit
 intel-dlfdkit-32bit
Intel® AI Analytics Toolkit 2021.1-beta07
 intel-aikit
 intel-aikit-32bit
Intel® oneAPI Rendering Toolkit 2021.1-beta07
intel-renderkit
intel-renderkit-32bit

The Intel® System Bring-Up Toolkit
is NOT distributed by repository

Details

   

The Intel® Distribution of OpenVINO™ toolkit for Linux*
is distributed on a separate repository

YUM instructions
 APT instructions

 

 

The Intel® FPGA Add-On for oneAPI Base Toolkit
is NOT distributed by repository

Details

 
 

Installation of Intel® oneAPI Toolkits on a supported linux system requires the following steps:

  1. If you have an existing oneAPI installation, REMOVE that installation before installing beta07.  After removing your old installation you can skip to STEP 5 
  2. Make sure your OS is supported.  The OS version can by found using one of these commands in a terminal window:
    # Redhat, Fedora, CentOS and related
    more /etc/redhat-release
    
    # Ubuntu, Debian, others
    more /etc/lsb-release
    
  3. DRIVER INSTALLATION - If this is your first installation of oneAPI, you will need to install the required drivers.  GO HERE FIRST TO INSTALL REQUIRED DRIVERS
  4. Set up your package manager to use the Intel repository.  Follow the instructions for your system and package manager below.
  5. Determine which Intel® oneAPI Toolkit package or packages you require, using the  Table of Packages .  Write down or copy your package name and continue to the next step.
    • Advanced Users ONLY: Do you want just 1 or 2 components?  We do provide individual component packages.  Keep in mind these may have dependencies on other component packages, so we only recommend this method for very experienced users.  Doing this individual component installation you may find the installed components "broken" due to missing dependencies.   Toolkits, by comparison, install all required components, runtimes and libraries and prevent dependency errors.
      • We do not publish lists of individual components.  You must search the 'intel' repository for component products.  As an example, if you want TBB only you can try this query:
        • apt search intel tbb | grep oneapi
      • The results of this query will return all versions, meta-packages and individual sub-components.  Look for the latest root meta-package which will have a name like "intel-oneapi-<component>"/all.  The name of the package you want in this example is "intel-oneapi-tbb". 
        FINAL WARNING NOTE: Installing the entire toolkit integrates the components and is the recommended method. If you are only installing specific components, extra steps may be required to integrate the components. If you have problems with integrated components (they install but don't work for example) remove them and install a complete Toolkit.
         
  6. Install packages using the package manager of your choice.  There are three package managers:  YUM* (DNF*), APT*, and ZYPPER*. 
  7. (Optional) If you also want to integrate tools into the Eclipse* IDE, Open Eclipse and verify that a menu titled “Intel” is present. If the menu is not present read this guide to Installing Eclipse* Plugins from the IDE.
  8. What's Next?  Get Started with the Intel® oneAPI Toolkits for Linux*.

YUM (DNF) repository instructions

Intel provides access to all of its oneAPI toolkits and packages through a public YUM (DNF) repository. The yum command is the primary tool for getting, installing, deleting, querying, and otherwise managing Red Hat* Enterprise Linux* RPM software packages. See below for instructions on how to pull the latest versions of the Intel tools. For more information, visit the official yum command cheat sheet.

  1. If you have an existing oneAPI installation from beta04 or older, use 'yum remove <packages>' to remove your old installation. For example:
    sudo -E yum remove intel-hpckit intel-basekit
    Once the older installation is removed you may skip to STEP 4 below to install your Toolkit(s).
     
  2. Setup the oneAPI repository.  First, make sure you have write permissions to /tmp.
    Next, create the YUM (DNF) repo file in the /tmp directory as a normal user:
    tee > /tmp/oneAPI.repo << EOF
    [oneAPI]
    name=Intel(R) oneAPI repository
    baseurl=https://yum.repos.intel.com/oneapi
    enabled=1
    gpgcheck=1
    repo_gpgcheck=1
    gpgkey=https://yum.repos.intel.com/intel-gpg-keys/GPG-PUB-KEY-INTEL-SW-PRODUCTS-2023.PUB
    EOF
    

     

  3. Next, move the newly created oneAPI.repo file to the YUM repo configuration directory /etc/yum.repos.d
    sudo mv /tmp/oneAPI.repo /etc/yum.repos.d
    

     

  4. Install the desired package.  Determine which Intel® oneAPI Toolkit package or packages you require.  A Table of Packages is at the top of this page.  If you are on a company intranet or behind a firewall make sure to set environment variables http_proxy and  https_proxy appropriate to allow yum access the repository servers using https protocol.
    To install a Toolkit, for example the Intel® oneAPI Base Toolkit, the meta package name is "intel-basekit" and it can be installed with the following:
    sudo yum install intel-basekit
    

    When installing on a machine with no internet access, or in the case of a large distributed installation on a cluster, yum supports downloading a package without installing it. See here for more details.

  5. Set user environment.  After oneAPI tools are installed, before accessing the tools, you must set up environment variables to access the tools.
    • See the Before You Begin page for setting up environment.  Then proceed to Run a Sample Project Using the Command Line to confirm correct installation.
    • Next, you might consider adding the 'source' of 'setvars.sh' to your ~/.bash_profile startup script.  If you manage a multi-user system, consider how to source this script for all login users, such as adding to your /etc/profile startup script or add it to user tools environment using modulefiles or similar.
       
  6. (Optional) If you also want to integrate tools into the Eclipse* IDE, Open Eclipse and verify that a menu titled “Intel” is present. If the menu is not present read this guide to Installing Eclipse* Plugins from the IDE.
     
  7. Installation complete!  What's next?  Get Started with the Intel® oneAPI Toolkits for Linux*.

NOTE: If you have applications with long-running GPU compute workloads in native environments, you must disable the hangcheck timeout period to avoid terminating workloads.

APT repository instructions

Intel provides access to all of its oneAPI toolkits and packages through a public APT repository. The apt command is a powerful command-line tool, which works with Ubuntu*'s Advanced Packaging Tool (APT) performing such functions as installation of new software packages, upgrade of existing software packages, updating of the package list index, and even upgrading the entire Ubuntu* system. See below for instructions on how to pull the latest versions of the Intel tools. For more information, visit the official apt command page.

  1. If you have an existing oneAPI installation from beta04 or older, use 'apt remove <packages>' to remove your old installation. For example:
    sudo -E apt remove intel-hpckit intel-basekit
    Once the older installation is removed you may skip to STEP 5 to install your Toolkit(s).

    Get the Intel Repository public key and install it.  We will do the following from /tmp since both users and root have read/write in /tmp.  You can use any other directory where you have read/write as both user and sudo user:
    # use wget to fetch the Intel repository public key
    cd /tmp
    wget https://apt.repos.intel.com/intel-gpg-keys/GPG-PUB-KEY-INTEL-SW-PRODUCTS-2023.PUB
    # add to your apt sources keyring so that archives signed with this key will be trusted.
    sudo apt-key add GPG-PUB-KEY-INTEL-SW-PRODUCTS-2023.PUB
    # remove the public key
    rm GPG-PUB-KEY-INTEL-SW-PRODUCTS-2023.PUB
    

     

  2. Configure the APT client to use Intel's repository:
    echo "deb https://apt.repos.intel.com/oneapi all main" | sudo tee /etc/apt/sources.list.d/oneAPI.list
    

    Alternatively, if add-apt-repository utility is installed, you can use something like:
    sudo add-apt-repository "deb https://apt.repos.intel.com/oneapi all main"
    

     

  3. Download package info for oneAPI Toolkit and components. 
    sudo apt-get update
    

     

  4. Install the desired package.  Determine which Intel® oneAPI Toolkit package or packages you require.  A Table of Packages is at the top of this page.   If you are on a company intranet or behind a firewall make sure to set environment variables http_proxy and https_proxy appropriate to allow yum access the repository servers using https protocol.
    To install a Toolkit, for example the Intel® oneAPI Base Toolkit, the meta package name is "intel-basekit" and it can be installed with the following:
    sudo apt-get install intel-basekit
    #repeat 'apt-get install ...' for each toolkit you need
    

     

  5. [Optional] See a list of oneAPI packages available for install:
    sudo apt-cache pkgnames intel | grep kit$
    # Other installation options (toolkits and individual components) are available in the form of # meta-packages.
    

     

  6. Set user environment.  After oneAPI tools are installed, before accessing the tools, you must set up environment variables to access the tools.
    • See the Before You Begin page for setting up environment.  Then proceed to Run a Sample Project Using the Command Line to confirm correct installation.
    • Next, you might consider adding the 'source' of 'setvars.sh' to your ~/.bash_profile startup script.  If you manage a multi-user system, consider how to source this script for all login users, such as adding to your /etc/profile startup script or add it to user tools environment using modulefiles or similar.
       
  7. (Optional) If you also want to integrate tools into the Eclipse* IDE, Open Eclipse and verify that a menu titled “Intel” is present. If the menu is not present read this guide to Installing Eclipse* Plugins from the IDE.
     
  8. Installation complete!  What's next?  Get Started with the Intel® oneAPI Toolkits for Linux*.

NOTE: If you have applications with long-running GPU compute workloads in native environments, you must disable the hangcheck timeout period to avoid terminating workloads.

Zypper repository instructions

Intel provides access to all of its oneAPI toolkits and packages through a public Zypper repository. Zypper is a command line package manager which provides functions like repository access, dependency solving, package installation, etc. for openSUSE* and SUSE* Linux* Enterprise. See below for instructions on how to pull the latest versions of the Intel tools. For more information, visit the official zypper command cheat sheet.

  1. If you have an existing oneAPI installation from beta04 or older, use 'zypper rm <packages>' to remove your old installation. For example:
    sudo -E zypper rm intel-hpckit intel-basekit
    Once the older installation is removed you may skip to STEP 3 below to install your beta05 kit(s).
     
  2. Add the Intel oneAPI repository public key:
    sudo zypper addrepo https://yum.repos.intel.com/oneapi oneAPI
    

    By adding this new repository, Zypper had to automatically import the public repo key.  For some cases rpm might require explicit key import by:
    rpm --import https://yum.repos.intel.com/intel-gpg-keys/GPG-PUB-KEY-INTEL-SW-PRODUCTS-2023.PUB
    

     

  3. Install the desired package.  Determine which Intel® oneAPI Toolkit package or packages you require.  A Table of Packages is at the top of this page.  If you are on a company intranet or behind a firewall make sure to set environment variables http_proxy and https_proxy appropriate to allow yum access the repository servers using https protocol.
    To install a Toolkit, for example the Intel® oneAPI Base Toolkit, the meta package name is "intel-basekit" and it can be installed with the following:
    sudo zypper install intel-basekit
    

     

  4. [Optional] When installing on a machine with no internet access, or in the case of a large distributed installation on a cluster, zypper supports downloading a package without installing it through the --download-only option. Visit the Zypper man pages for more details.

  5. Set user environment.  After oneAPI tools are installed, before accessing the tools, you must set up environment variables to access the tools.
    • See the Before You Begin page for setting up environment.  Then proceed to Run a Sample Project Using the Command Line to confirm correct installation.
    • Next, you might consider adding the 'source' of 'setvars.sh' to your ~/.bash_profile startup script.  If you manage a multi-user system, consider how to source this script for all login users, such as adding to your /etc/profile startup script or add it to user tools environment using modulefiles or similar.
  6. (Optional) If you also want to integrate tools into the Eclipse* IDE, Open Eclipse and verify that a menu titled “Intel” is present. If the menu is not present read this guide to Installing Eclipse* Plugins from the IDE.
     
  7. Installation complete!  What's next? Get Started with the Intel® oneAPI Toolkits for Linux*

NOTE: If you have applications with long-running GPU compute workloads in native environments, you must disable the hangcheck timeout period to avoid terminating workloads.

Install Intel GPU Drivers  

If you are using a discrete Intel GPU, you will need to install the latest drivers because they are not included in oneAPI toolkit installation package.

Disable Hangcheck

This section applies only to applications with long-running GPU compute workloads in native environments. Not recommended for virtualizations or other standard usages of GPU, such as gaming.

A workload that takes more than four seconds for GPU hardware to execute is a long running workload. By default, individual threads that qualify as long-running workloads are considered hung and are terminated. Disabling the hangcheck timeout period avoids this problem.

NOTE: If the system is rebooted, hangcheck is automatically enabled. You must disable hangcheck again after every reboot or follow the directions below to disable hangcheck persistently (across multiple reboots).

 

To disable hangcheck until the next reboot:

sudo sh -c "echo N> /sys/module/i915/parameters/enable_hangcheck"


To disable hangcheck across multiple reboots:

  1. Open a terminal and run this command:
    Append i915.enable_hangcheck=0 to GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT in /etc/default/grub
    Run sudo update-grub
    

     

  2. Reboot the system. Hangcheck will remain disabled.

Have Questions?

Check out the FAQ
See our Get Help page for your support options.


Appendix 1: Full List of KIT packages

The following list is all of the meta-package KIT component packages supporting oneAPI Kits.  This list was generated with an Ubuntu APT-CACHE query:  YUM and ZYPPER will have similar query commands.  The Ubuntu command was:

sudo -E apt-cache pkgnames intel | grep kit | sort | grep -v beta

List of KIT component packages:

 
intel-aikit
intel-aikit-32bit
intel-aikit-getting-started
intel-aikit-runtime
intel-aikit-runtime-32bit
intel-basekit
intel-basekit-32bit
intel-basekit-getting-started
intel-basekit-runtime
intel-basekit-runtime-32bit
intel-dlfdkit
intel-dlfdkit-32bit
intel-dlfdkit-getting-started
intel-dlfdkit-runtime
intel-dlfdkit-runtime-32bit
intel-hpckit
intel-hpckit-32bit
intel-hpckit-getting-started
intel-hpckit-runtime
intel-hpckit-runtime-32bit
intel-iotkit
intel-iotkit-32bit
intel-iotkit-getting-started
intel-iotkit-runtime
intel-iotkit-runtime-32bit
intel-renderkit
intel-renderkit-32bit
intel-renderkit-getting-started
intel-renderkit-runtime
intel-renderkit-runtime-32bit

Appendix 2: Full List of ALL oneAPI packages

The following list is all of the low-level oneAPI packages. In most cases you probably want a KIT meta-package. This list is provided to document all packages provided by the Intel repository server. Notice that we filter out the "beta" names - this list provides the most recent packages. If you need an older beta package you can remove the "grep -v beta" filter. This list was generated with an Ubuntu APT-CACHE query:  YUM and ZYPPER will have similar query commands.  The Ubuntu command was:

 
sudo -E apt-cache pkgnames intel | grep oneapi | sort | grep -v beta 

Full list of current oneapi low-level component packages

 
intel-oneapi-advisor
intel-oneapi-ccl
intel-oneapi-clck
intel-oneapi-common-licensing
intel-oneapi-common-vars
intel-oneapi-condaindex
intel-oneapi-daal
intel-oneapi-daal-32bit
intel-oneapi-daal-devel
intel-oneapi-daal-devel-32bit
intel-oneapi-dev-utilities
intel-oneapi-dev-utilities-eclipse-cfg
intel-oneapi-dnnl
intel-oneapi-dnnl-devel
intel-oneapi-dpcpp-compiler
intel-oneapi-dpcpp-compiler-eclipse-cfg
intel-oneapi-dpcpp-ct
intel-oneapi-dpcpp-ct-eclipse-cfg
intel-oneapi-dpcpp-debugger
intel-oneapi-eclipse-ide
intel-oneapi-embree
intel-oneapi-embree-3.6.1
intel-oneapi-embree-3.7.0
intel-oneapi-embree-3.8.0
intel-oneapi-embree-3.9.0
intel-oneapi-icc
intel-oneapi-icc-32bit
intel-oneapi-icc-eclipse-cfg
intel-oneapi-icc-runtime
intel-oneapi-icc-runtime-32bit
intel-oneapi-ifort
intel-oneapi-ifort-32bit
intel-oneapi-ifort-runtime
intel-oneapi-ifort-runtime-32bit
intel-oneapi-inspector
intel-oneapi-iot-eclipse-plugins
intel-oneapi-iot-eclipse-plugins-cfg
intel-oneapi-ipp
intel-oneapi-ipp-32bit
intel-oneapi-ipp-devel
intel-oneapi-ipp-devel-32bit
intel-oneapi-itac
intel-oneapi-libdpstd-devel
intel-oneapi-mkl
intel-oneapi-mkl-32bit
intel-oneapi-mkl-devel
intel-oneapi-mkl-devel-32bit
intel-oneapi-mpi
intel-oneapi-mpi-devel
intel-oneapi-oidn
intel-oneapi-oidn-1.0.0
intel-oneapi-oidn-1.1.0
intel-oneapi-oidn-1.2.0
intel-oneapi-onevpl
intel-oneapi-onevpl-devel
intel-oneapi-openmp
intel-oneapi-openmp-32bit
intel-oneapi-openvkl
intel-oneapi-openvkl-0.7.0
intel-oneapi-openvkl-0.8.0
intel-oneapi-openvkl-0.9.0
intel-oneapi-ospray
intel-oneapi-ospray-1.8.5
intel-oneapi-ospray-2.0.0
intel-oneapi-ospray-2.0.1
intel-oneapi-ospray-2.1.0
intel-oneapi-python
intel-oneapi-pytorch
intel-oneapi-rkcommon
intel-oneapi-rkcommon-1.3.0
intel-oneapi-socwatch
intel-oneapi-sys-dbg
intel-oneapi-tbb
intel-oneapi-tbb-32bit
intel-oneapi-tbb-devel
intel-oneapi-tbb-devel-32bit
intel-oneapi-tensorflow
intel-oneapi-vtune

Have Questions?

Check out the FAQ
See our Get Help page for your support options.

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Product and Performance Information

1

Intel's compilers may or may not optimize to the same degree for non-Intel microprocessors for optimizations that are not unique to Intel microprocessors. These optimizations include SSE2, SSE3, and SSSE3 instruction sets and other optimizations. Intel does not guarantee the availability, functionality, or effectiveness of any optimization on microprocessors not manufactured by Intel. Microprocessor-dependent optimizations in this product are intended for use with Intel microprocessors. Certain optimizations not specific to Intel microarchitecture are reserved for Intel microprocessors. Please refer to the applicable product User and Reference Guides for more information regarding the specific instruction sets covered by this notice.

Notice revision #20110804