Developer Guide and Reference

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Using Makefiles to Compile Your Application

This topic describes the use of makefiles to compile your application. You can use makefiles to specify a number of files with various paths, and to save this information for multiple compilations.

Using Makefiles to Store Information for Compilation on Linux*
or
macOS*

To run
make
from the command line using the Intel®
C++
Compiler, make sure that
/usr/bin
and
/usr/local/bin
are in your
PATH
environment variable.
If you use the C shell, you can edit your
.cshrc
file and add the following:
setenv PATH /usr/bin:/usr/local/bin:
$PATH
To use the Intel® C++ Compiler, your makefile must include the setting
CC=icpc
. Use the same setting on the command line to instruct the makefile to use the Intel® C++ Compiler. If your makefile is written for GCC*, the GNU* C compiler, you need to change the command line options that are not recognized by the Intel® C++ Compiler. Run
make
, using the following syntax:
make -f
yourmakefile
Where
-f
is the
make
command option to specify a particular makefile name.

Using Makefiles to Store Information for Compilation on Windows*

To use a makefile to compile your source files, use the
nmake
command
with the following syntax:
nmake /f [makefile_name.mak] CPP=[compiler_name.exe] [LINK32=[linker_name.exe]
For example:
prompt> nmake /f your_project.mak CPP=icl.exe LINK32=xilink.exe
Argument
Description
/f
The
nmake
option to specify a makefile.