Developer Guide and Reference

Contents

General Rules for Compiler Options

This section describes general rules for compiler options and it contains information about how we refer to compiler option names in descriptions.

General Rules for Compiler Options

You cannot combine options with a single dash (Linux*) or slash (Windows*). For example:
  • On Linux* systems: This form is incorrect:
    -Ec
    ; this form is correct:
    -E -c
  • On Windows* systems: This form is incorrect:
    /Ec
    ; this form is correct:
    /E /c
All compiler options are case sensitive.
Some options have different meanings depending on their case; for example, option "c" prevents linking, but option "C"
places comments in preprocessed source output.
Options specified on the command line apply to all files named on the command line.
Options can take arguments in the form of file names, strings, letters, or numbers. If a string includes spaces, the string must be enclosed in quotation marks. For example:
  • On Linux* systems,
    -unroll
    [=
    n
    ] or
    -U
    name
    (string)
  • On Windows* systems,
    /Fa
    myfile.s
    (file name) or
    /V
    "version 5.0"
    (string)
Compiler options can appear in any order.
On Windows* systems, all compiler options must precede
/link
options, if any, on the command line.
Unless you specify certain options, the command line will both compile and link the files you specify.
You can abbreviate some option names, entering as many characters as are needed to uniquely identify the option.
Certain options accept one or more keyword arguments following the option name. For example, the
ax
option accepts several keywords.
To specify multiple keywords, you typically specify the option multiple times.
Compiler options remain in effect for the whole compilation unless overridden by a compiler
#pragma
.
To disable an option, specify the negative form of the option.
On Windows* systems, you can also disable one or more optimization options by specifying option
/Od
last on the command line.
On Windows* systems, the
/Od
option is part of a mutually-exclusive group of options that includes
/Od
,
/O1
,
/O2
,
/O3
, and
/Ox
. The last of any of these options specified on the command line will override the previous options from this group.
If there are enabling and disabling versions of an option on the command line, the last one on the command line takes precedence.

How We Refer to Compiler Option Names in Descriptions

The following conventions are used as shortcuts when referencing compiler option names in descriptions:
  • Many options have names that are the same on Linux* and Windows*. However, the Windows form starts with an initial / and the Linux form starts with an initial -. Within text, such option names are shown without the initial character; for example,
    check
    .
  • Many options have names that are the same on Linux* and Windows*, except that the Windows form starts with an initial Q. Within text, such option names are shown as
    [Q]option-name
    .
    For example, if you see a reference to
    [Q]ipo
    , the Linux* form of the option is
    -ipo
    and the Windows form of the option is
    /Qipo
    .
  • This content is specific to C++; it does not apply to
    DPC++
    .
    Several compiler options have similar names except that the Linux* forms start with an initial q and the Windows form starts with an initial Q. Within text, such option names are shown as
    [q or Q]option-name
    .
    For example, if you see a reference to
    [q or Q]opt-report
    , the Linux* form of the option is
    -qopt-report
    and the Windows form of the option is
    /Qopt-report
    .
Compiler option names that are more dissimilar are shown in full.

Product and Performance Information

1

Performance varies by use, configuration and other factors. Learn more at www.Intel.com/PerformanceIndex.