I would not apply for a microgrant that would award one to people like me!

Groucho Marx

Who's Buried in Grant's Tomb?

The punchline to that old joke, for those of you who did not grow up in the United States, is Grant, as in Ulysses S. Grant, the civil war general. The point of the joke, beloved of Groucho Marx on the old "You bet your Life" show, is that sometimes the easy answer is the right one and that over-thinking will lead you astray.

So why do I bring this up? I wonder if something similar is occurring with our Microgrants for Parallelism program. After a great start in round one, the number of grant applications in round two remains small. We will have received some fantatstic entries, from passionate community members looking to bolster their work with a cash grant. Will yours be one of them; why not? My guess is that people may think that there is a hidden catch, that the bar is too high to compete or perhaps that grants are just intimidating. My answer to all those fears, if they are indeed accurate guesses, is try! We want to encourage innovation in teaching all quarters.

It is also possible that we have timed the grants too closely together or that they are clashing with the academic calendar, I know that many of you are working on grading and finals now. If so, let us know.

Finally, there is one possibility that I shudder to contemplate. Perhaps in the words of the inimitable Professor Rufus T. Firefly, you just "don't care to belong to a club that accepts people like me as members."

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Comments

kathy-farrel (Intel)'s picture

Free money? Sounds like a no-brainer to me. Nothing to lose, a microgrant to gain!

Paul Steinberg (Intel)'s picture

So I just got through a quick scan of the Round Two submissions and they are really good! It will be hard judging again. A good dilemma, but a dilemma none-the-less.