Maybe this iGravy iTrain is still running

Saw a report that Apple is being sued by an Arizona company for infringing on their name iCloud. The CNet story and comments from the ZDNet reflection detail a few other similar cases that Apple has run into recently and how they have had to pay for licensing other 'i' prefixed names and web domains.

This got me thinking. If I trademark a name or grab a web domain name that Apple needs in a few years, I could be rolling in the dough when they want to use it. But what will Apple be producing/promoting in 5-7 years that I could get in on now?  The first thought I had was for iClay, which would be virtual modeling clay or software to manipulate a virtual lump of clay (the results of which could be "printed" on a 3-D printer like the MakerBot Thing-O-Matic).

Less serious thoughts were iRobot (which I expected to be held by Isaac Asimov's estate, but is really a robot manufacturing company) and iTheJury (which I expected Mickey Spillane's estate to hold, but can't find any evidence [pun intended] to back up that idea).

I may already have a jump on this from my blog post "iBank, uBank, we all Bank @ eBank" from Februarly 2010. This covers three prefixed vowels in front of "Bank". It would be just my luck that if I went ahead with this get-rich-quick scheme that Apple would decide to let me sue them over the rights. Or, everyone else has had this same idea, well before me, and already sewn up the most obvious 'i' names.

Maybe I need to figure out what the next popular prefix letter will be and start trademarking those names. Of course, if it takes too long for the next wave of technology to adopt those names, they may belong to my estate and I'll never see a dime or I'll go broke from all of the trademark filing fees.

I think I should stick to programming.
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Comments

Some other ideas that have come to mind...

iBall - a virtual paddleball game for the iDevices. You can select whether the screen is the front or back of the paddle, and you can select what the ball looks like. Simply move the device back and forth to keep the ball bouncing and in motion. Should have a counter and optional noise of the ball bouncing, plus the animation of the ball going off and back to the paddle. (Hey! AppUp developers! Have you got this, yet?) Since this isn't a device, maybe it should be "yBall".

iSore - medical device to relieve muscle pain.

iCaramba - Translation device that only works to translate episodes of "The Simpson's" either from or to a foreign language.

Note: Some of the above names have been adopted for other uses, so there may be some legal issues should anyone actively pursue them. I've done only cursory research and bear no responsibility for the trouble for any abuse of trademark or copyright violations such person or persons may find themselves in for implementing the suggested uses above. (I'm just in it for the puns.)


My wife came up with "iDrops" last night. She would make it a digital rain simulation. I thought it might be something for a rain SFX in movies.

She also suggested the next prefix letter should be "y", which is sometimes a vowel. Products under the new letter might include "yKnot" (a rope tying application or device), "yADuck" (a database of Marx Brothers jokes) and "ySpock" (an interactive Wikipedia interface app that has an explanation for almost anything).