Jumping for Intel's Burst-mode Camera on Intel Android Devices

[This post is a short version  of a blog wrote by Eric Adam, Android Product Technical Marketing Engineer (TME) with Intel]

I’ve been working on Android for a year now and I can see a dramatic shift in the attitude of people towards Intel’s work on Android.  Now that Intel have actual products shipping with competitive power, I can see the momentum and excitement building around Android on x86.  There is so much Intel is doing which includes:

  • Optimizing the Android stack for both power and efficiency from the top layers down to the kernel. 
  • Providing some of our best tools like Intel Graphics Performance Analyzer (See this article for product information on Intel GPA's support of Android* phones (including instructions for downloading the Ubuntu* version for Android*)) to help developers write the best code.
  • Speeding up the very slow Android emulator through a HAXM driver that uses Intel VT-d technology.  You can now play games like Fruit Ninja inside of the emulator on a MacBook Pro laptop as fast as if you are on an actual Android tablet.  This is only possible when emulating an x86 image.

In this blog, I will bring to light to one of the cool features that Intel has: our burst mode camera technology. 

The burst mode camera feature was a crowd favorite at Beijing IDF and something that people could really relate to.  At that time a few months ago a few phone are the market was just being announced supporting a burst mode of 4 full resolution images per second.  These are impressive performance numbers, I did some fun test on an Intel phone with more burst mode capability enabled, It brought a smile to my face because every time I would show this I would open up the camera app, hold the button, and let it go click click click click like a machine gun. I think it was taking pictures even faster than it could output the sound of the “click’s.”   Every people around me impressed. They really like a feature.    

A few friend did ask me why anyone would want to snap so many pictures so fast.   I showed them the pictures of me jumping in front of the massive Android logo that I had taken the day before.  It is hard to capture that perfect jump shot especially when you give your camera to someone else to take the picture. With the burst mode feature in a phone or a tablet it makes it easier.  I did have a few people staring at me wondering why a guy would jump up in the air like that but I think they pictures were worth it. Thanks go to one of my colleague who took the pictures for me. As a final note, the BKM( Best Known Method) I have learned from all of this is to use a longer shirt next time.

Resized pictures (The originals were 3264 x 2448 resolution)

Fun continues! Read the comments and replies of some of my friends and colleagues who read this blog:

1.    Yea my current phone takes 3-4 seconds to focus and take a picture and then you have to disposition the picture (save/email/text/delete) before you can take another one, so it's very hard to capture the moment. I think this picture rapid fire is definitely a useful feature!

2.     That is the *perfect* usage scenario. We had a birthday party for my 2-year-old son on Saturday, and he's mostly a blur in the pictures we took. :)

3.     Who is writing the apps to observe and critique one's golf, tennis or baseball swing? :-)

4.     Cool! Now we need some cool software to do all kinds of transformations (way way beyond some famous photos apps)! And we have the powerful Atom processor to make that happen!

5.    Let me share a normal usage scenario outside the home that I often run into when I am taking a picture of my family.  It easily takes around 15-25 seconds from the time I position the folks, focus the camera, wait for the camera to take the picture and copy and then I preview to see it has come out okay.  What happens invariably during this time is making the people who are crossing by to wait till we finish taking the picture.  I can imagine camera with burst mode feature saving a good amount of waiting time.

6.    Pretty awesome.... I would love this feature especially if you would like to click your children playing.

7.    Pretty cool! Can see some good value for healthcare usage here....

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