Connecting to your Board Using Ethernet over USB

When you are in a busy or restricted network environment, you can connect to the Intel® Edison board using a micro-USB cable and a virtual Ethernet connection, known as Ethernet over USB. Below are the guidelines to connnect to your Intel® Edison board using Ethernet over USB and obtain an IP address for the board.

Ethernet over USB allows you to program your board offline. Using this method will disable the Wi-Fi* connection on your computer as long as Ethernet over USB is being used. Ethernet over USB uses the RNDIS protocol.

Windows* and Linux* host operating systems support ethernet over USB.

Requirements

  • You have assembled your Arduino* expansion board or your mini breakout expansion board, installed the appropriate drivers, and flashed the OS image (formerly called firmware).
  • The microswitch on your Intel® Edison board is toggled down towards the micro type-B USB ports.
    Example of the microswitch in the down position

Choose your Operating System

Instructions for Windows*

These are the steps to update your system network adapter configuration with a static IP address to use Ethernet over USB.

  1. Check your Network Connections:
    • In Windows 7, go to the Control Panel. Under Network and Internet, click View network status and tasks. Click Change Adapter Settings in the sidebar.
    • In Windows 8 and Windows 10, right-click the Windows Start menu button and select Network Connections.
  2. Plug the micro type-B USB cable into the micro type-B USB port closest to the middle of the board. Plug the other end of the cable in to your computer.
    edison-main-usb
  3. Look for a network adapter with the label RNDIS. Right-click the network adapter, then select Properties to configure its IP address.
  4. From the list, select IPV4.
  5. Change the IP information as follows:
    • IP: 192.168.2.2
      If you get a system notification that 192.168.2.2 is taken, try any IP address from 192.168.2.1 to 192.168.2.14. Do not use 192.168.2.15.
    • Mask: 255.255.255.0

You can now ping your Intel® Edison board on address 192.168.2.15 from your computer's command line. You can also use PuTTY to SSH into the board at the same IP address.
If you are using the Intel® XDK, the IDE should automatically detect your board. Connect to your board using the IP address 192.168.2.15 to upload your programs.

If you don't see the RNDIS adapter

If you don't see an adapter called RNDIS in the steps above, you need to install RNDIS drivers, then follow the steps above to set up Ethernet over USB.

  1. Go to Device Manager. Under Other Devices you should see an entry for RNDIS.
  2. Right-click the entry, then select Properties. On the General tab, select Update driver.
  3. Click Browse my computer for driver software, then Let me pick from a list of device driver in my computer.
  4. In the list, select Network Adapters, then click Next.
  5. In the Manufacturers list on the left, select Microsoft.
  6. Select the network connection corresponding to the RNDIS gadget and install it, then continue with the steps to set up Ethernet over USB above. For more information on this issue, see the Internet of Things forum.

Instructions for Linux*

These are the steps to set up Ethernet over USB by forwarding connections to the IP address 192.168.2.2 through the USB cable.

  1. Open a new Terminal window.
  2. Plug the micro type-B USB cable into the micro type-B USB port closest to the middle of the board. Plug the other end of the cable in to your computer.
    edison-main-usb
  3. Use the ifconfig command to forward connections to the IP address 192.168.2.2 through the USB cable. Enter the command:

    sudo ifconfig usb0 192.168.2.2

    You may be prompted for your user password.

You can now ping your board on address 192.168.2.15 from a Terminal. You can also use Terminal to SSH into the board at the same IP address.

If you are using the Intel® XDK, the IDE should automatically detect your board. Connect to your board using the IP address 192.168.2.15 to upload your programs.

For more complete information about compiler optimizations, see our Optimization Notice.