questions about intel C++ studio XE 2013

questions about intel C++ studio XE 2013

Q:intel C++ studio XE 2013 when does next version come out?
Q:intel C++ studio XE 2013 does this c++ compiler come with any build tools?
Q:intel C++ studio XE 2013 what can I do if I find a compiler bug? do compiler fixes come with the price?
Q:intel C++ studio XE 2013 what type of license is this? am hoping for single-user at least.

 

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Some of your questions should be answered on the product web pages e.g.

http://software.intel.com/en-us/c-compilers

http://software.intel.com/en-us/intel-compilers

There's really not much need to time your purchase, as your purchase of a year of support entitles you to download updates (including bug fixes) released within a year of when you register the license, and to receive support on problem reports during that period.

A minor version upgrade is likely to come around the end of April, according to recent comments on these forums, and major version upgrades have been issued in November for several years.  It's not clear that this next major upgrade will be more than evolutionary according to information available to us on the outside.

Q:intel C++ studio XE 2013 when does next version come out?

A: Sorry, your question can't be answered before product release. Is there any specific features you're looking for? 

Q:intel C++ studio XE 2013 does this c++ compiler come with any build tools?

A: Do you mean the "make" tool or IDE? No. The Intel C++ compiler uses the following build tools:

  • on Windows, Intel C++ compiler integrates to Visual Studio 2008 to VS2013. It also supports "msbuild".
  • on Linux, Intel C++ compiler integrates to Eclipse too. But you can use the build tool that works with gcc for icc too.
  • on OS X, Intel C++ compiler integrated to XCode. Also the same build tool for gcc also works icc.

Q:intel C++ studio XE 2013 what can I do if I find a compiler bug? do compiler fixes come with the price?

A: you can file a ticket to Intel Premier Support or report to this forum. For general questions, this forum might be better.

Q:intel C++ studio XE 2013 what type of license is this? am hoping for single-user at least.

A: there are different type of licenses. Please see this license FAQ.

Hope this helps.

Thanks,

Jennifer

Quote:

Tim Prince wrote:

Some of your questions should be answered on the product web pages e.g.

http://software.intel.com/en-us/c-compilers

http://software.intel.com/en-us/intel-compilers

There's really not much need to time your purchase, as your purchase of a year of support entitles you to download updates (including bug fixes) released within a year of when you register the license, and to receive support on problem reports during that period.

A minor version upgrade is likely to come around the end of April, according to recent comments on these forums, and major version upgrades have been issued in November for several years.  It's not clear that this next major upgrade will be more than evolutionary according to information available to us on the outside.

please define what you mean by "evolutionary"?

support costs were not quantified. I would like to know up front how much it's going to cost.

I looked at the web pages first, that's how I ended up with the questions.

by support you mean IPS (Premier Support)? I did not see details.

please answer the questions.

Q:intel C++ anything: do these compilers do full c++11 and C99? if not, what percentage? does it have std::thread and std::mutex?

if you don't know that's fine. I think I can assume it's at least a majority.

Most of the C99 features are supported by Intel® C++ Composer XE 2011, 2013 for Windows*, Linux* and Mac OS* X.

For C++11 support in Intel C++ compiler, you may refere to link http://software.intel.com/en-us/articles/c0x-features-supported-by-intel-c-compiler.

 

 

hmm. is there any way to use the intel c++ compiler from the commandline without VS2012? I would assume there is. is a GUI really necessary? was hoping to use a different build environment. maybe my own design.

I hope windows version comes with a resource compiler. I don't know what kinds of binaries it comes with, web site doesn't give any details.

thanks for the help.

 

Yes, command-line integration is there. GUI is not a mandate thing.

You can refer to release notes of the specific product.

For example Intel® C++ Composer XE 2013 SP1 Release Notes

 http://software.intel.com/sites/default/files/Release_Notes_C_2013SP1_W_EN_update2.pdf

Reddy

Quote:

Jim M. wrote:

Quote:

Tim Prince wrote:

Some of your questions should be answered on the product web pages e.g.

http://software.intel.com/en-us/c-compilers

http://software.intel.com/en-us/intel-compilers

There's really not much need to time your purchase, as your purchase of a year of support entitles you to download updates (including bug fixes) released within a year of when you register the license, and to receive support on problem reports during that period.

A minor version upgrade is likely to come around the end of April, according to recent comments on these forums, and major version upgrades have been issued in November for several years.  It's not clear that this next major upgrade will be more than evolutionary according to information available to us on the outside.

 

please define what you mean by "evolutionary"?

support costs were not quantified. I would like to know up front how much it's going to cost.

I looked at the web pages first, that's how I ended up with the questions.

by support you mean IPS (Premier Support)? I did not see details.

please answer the questions.

Your questions were so un-specific it wasn't clear which web pages you had studied.  Among other things, it could make a difference which architecture(s) you want to support.

The only fee you pay for support is renewal after a year. Yes, the fee pays for a year of support via IPS.  

By evolutionary, I mean I would expect no major changes over the next year.  According to past practice, it could include dropping support for the 2011 compiler series.

Quote:

Jim M. wrote:

Q:intel C++ anything: do these compilers do full c++11 and C99? if not, what percentage? does it have std::thread and std::mutex?

if you don't know that's fine. I think I can assume it's at least a majority.

c99 support is close to the same as in gcc; a fair degree of gcc 4.7 compatibility is provided in the linux compilers even when running on a system with a gcc as old as 4.4.  The level of gcc compatibility has never been specific; it's implied in part in the level of OS compatibility specified for linux or MAC. 

Windows C++11 compatibility depends on Visual Studio 2013.  

You said you read all the web pages, so why continue to ask?

I saw some confusions here. Let me try to explain:

1) using Intel C++ compiler with only cmdline: it is supported. but still requires the VS express edition. you could install the VS2012/2013 express edition. icl relies the header/libs/build-tools like rc.exe, link.exe, lib.exe etc from the VS express edition.

2) the Intel C++ compiler's C++11 support: it will support the same C++11 features as in the cl.exe found from the path -- either VS2008/2010/2012/2013. if using /Qstd=c++11, it will include all the C++11 features that icl supports depending on the icl version.

Jennifer

my preference would be to have a commercial windows-hosted c++11 compiler which targets OSX, linux 32+64-bit, and windows 32+64-bit (android and iOS is a plus) which has a license that allows for distributing source code and my libraries with source code.

but so far what I find is I cannot afford it or it doesn't have mentioned features, so I am probably going to have to settle for just a commercial windows compiler. VC++ doesn't fit the criteria for license.

the intel compiler pages are just a little vague - do not show specifically what the intel package provides and what it relies on from the hosted compiler package. things like this help in my decision making, since I have my own build system, and separation lines are important.

VC++ does not have a parallel build system yet (surprisingly), and gnu make -j 5 for doing parallel builds causes compile errors (for now). I expect these things to change. when vc++ does get it, I hope the the whole set handles parallel builds just fine. to get all the threads working on windows instead of 1/2 you have to tweak a registry entry, but note that cpu will get a llttle under twice as hot, so the best closed loop liquid cooling is a minimum good idea for doing that, otherwise leave at 1/2 mast and windows will scale your processes and threads down - article on cakewalk support page: http://forum.cakewalk.com/Windows-7-amp-Core-Parking-a-better-way-to-Tur...

VS express is a trial edition licensed for 30 days. I need something I can keep.

I now understand that at very least intel compiler relies on the VC2012 cl.exe somehow (C++ preprocessor? memory fuzzy).

it should be noted to the web design team that http://software.intel.com/en-us/intel-compilers does not seem to be directly accessible via the web site menus. that is why I did not find that information at first about support.

how much is support renewal after the 1 year, per year? still could maybe use that answer, but now only out of curiosity. does it depend on the compiler? I am interested in intel C++ studio XE 2013 and intel C++ composer. right now I have been informed that the costs are too high even for VS2012 as it stand right now.

 

 

Quote:

Jim M. wrote:

my preference would be to have a commercial windows-hosted c++11 compiler which targets OSX, linux 32+64-bit, and windows 32+64-bit (android and iOS is a plus) which has a license that allows for distributing source code and my libraries with source code.

I think you've built up to an impossible combination of requirements.  Cross-compilation to that extent seems to be the province of gcc, so you wouldn't find it in a commercial compiler (Intel does sell cross compilers targeting Android Intel CPU but not with so much C++11).  linux hosting would be an easier starting point, since most of those targets are handled routinely that way, but the available licenses are chosen for you.

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