System BIOS does not boot up

System BIOS does not boot up

I have an Intel S5520SC motherboard (which supports 64-bit mmio addressing), and an Intel Xeoh Phi 5110P. The system power supply is 1200W.

When I press the machine start button, the system cannot boot up (i.e., the BIOS screen does not even show up), and there's no beeping warning. Very soon, the Xeon Phi card becomes very hot (I cannot even touch it).

Does anyone know what may be going wrong here? Thanks!

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Maybe there is no support for Xeon Phi in your BIOS.

@iliyapolak, how do I know whether my BIOS supports Xeon Phi? I bought that new motherboard because it was listed as a recommended MB by Intel in an earlier release notes of Xeon Phi.

Thanks!

Did you try to boot your system without Xeon Phi installed?

Regarding your question, I searched your motherboard installation and specification guide there is no any mention about the Xeon Phi.Maybe you bought an older revision of the motherboard?

Hi ,

I have found a few interesting links to check
Link://software.intel.com/en-us/articles/intel-manycore-platform-software-stack-mpss

This is follow up

Regarding your BIOS version.Please remove Xeon Phi from your system,boot your workstation note the exact BIOS version/revision and it must be compared to BIOS which supports Xeon Phi.

Hi, @iliyapolak. The system boots up successfully with the Xeon Phi card replaced with a normal vedio card. I wish there might be some configurations in the BIOS that solves this problem.

Before buying this new motherboard, I tried the card on an old desktop-class motherboard, which can boots up the system successfully though. But of course, since it does not support 64-bit addressing, the card cannot be used on that system.

S5520SC was released in Q1 2009, so it is no woder why its specification guide does not mention Xeon Phi. The tricky thing is that the Intel guys don't want to release currently supported motherboard requirement, which leaves HPC fan like me in the middle of nowhere.

>>>The system boots up successfully with the Xeon Phi card replaced with a normal vedio card>>>

Sorry,but I did not understand the quoted sentence.Did you try to boot your system up without discret video card or your motherboard has on-board gpraphics chip?

Did you check on their website for newer motherboard/BIOS versions? If you are HPC fan and I do not want to suggest anything, but was not better option to go with high-end gpu for example GeForce Titan?

After removing the Xeon Phi card, the system can boot up successfully with a discrete video card installed.

I cannot find the motherboard/BIOS versions that support Xeon Phi on their website. I've been quite familiar with the AMD/NVIDIA GPUs, so I decided to try something new. That's why I bought Xeon Phi, and a whole new machine for it :)

I thought initially that you tried to boot your system up with Xeon Phi installed, but without any video card. Can you replace your current motherboard with the other working motherboard?Did you do any programming on GPU cards?

Most curious.  May we take it as a given that you have enabled any BIOS support for memory mapped I/O address ranges above 4GB and plugged in all the power connectors properly?  Is there a setting in your BIOS that makes it want to use the card plugged in as a graphics card (I've seen this on boards with integrated graphics - some want you to tell it which graphics to use - auto, integrated only, or PCI-e only)?  Does the system beep at all when coming up normally with the graphics card installed?  With the Xeon Phi card in, do you see any indication that the system is running but not putting up video (like disk activity).  Are the Xeon Phi's fans running (do you have one with fans in it)?

Basically, we need to figure out if the system is entirely frozen on adding a Xeon Phi card, or if we are "just" getting no display.  And whether the Xeon Phi is getting any cooling.

Charles,

Initially I thought that thread starter tried to boot his system up with Xeon Phi card , but without the video card.Maybe as you suggested the integrated on-board card was not choosen as a primary video card in BIOS.I do not think that Xeon Phi could lead to total lock up of BIOS video handler interrupt routine.

The server BIOS which was used with the Shady Cove platform (apparently the motherboard referred to above) to support the Knights Ferry MIC coprocessor required an upgrade to support the Knights corner MIC coprocessor.  I'm running the coprocessor there since the 12-core host upgrade has removed (temporarily?) support for it.  The required BIOS update is distinguished from the earlier one by the presence of the setup option for MMIO above 4GB which has been mentioned frequently on this forum.

So the error probably boils down to the old BIOS.

Thank you all for your great advice. I tried to upgrade the BIOS for my motherboard, and now the system boots up succsessfully, and the xeon phi can be recognized as a PCIe device by the RHEL 6.4 OS. So, that was indeed the old BIOS problem.

The firmware I used to upgrade the motherboard was downloaded here:

https://downloadcenter.intel.com/Detail_Desc.aspx?agr=Y&DwnldID=22129&ke...

I'll keep you posted what happens next. Thanks!

Hi, Charles. My Xeon Phi 5110P does not come with a built-in fan. Does it matter if it becomes very hot? Is there any external fan I can use to cool it? Thanks!

Quote:

Charles Congdon (Intel) wrote:

Most curious.  May we take it as a given that you have enabled any BIOS support for memory mapped I/O address ranges above 4GB and plugged in all the power connectors properly?  Is there a setting in your BIOS that makes it want to use the card plugged in as a graphics card (I've seen this on boards with integrated graphics - some want you to tell it which graphics to use - auto, integrated only, or PCI-e only)?  Does the system beep at all when coming up normally with the graphics card installed?  With the Xeon Phi card in, do you see any indication that the system is running but not putting up video (like disk activity).  Are the Xeon Phi's fans running (do you have one with fans in it)?

Basically, we need to figure out if the system is entirely frozen on adding a Xeon Phi card, or if we are "just" getting no display.  And whether the Xeon Phi is getting any cooling.

As far as I know, the coprocessor cards without built-in fan (none of which I've seen myself) were intended to be used with special external cooling systems,  I don't know whether the specific cooling systems for this purpose are available separately from the servers which were designed around them.

Glad the BIOS helped. 

As for your Xeon Phi having no fan, as Tim says that means it is a card designed for a high-density server platform with external fans to provide sufficient cooling airflow for the motherboard, CPU, and any plug-in card.  I would not recommend using such a card in any workstation chassis I have seen so far - few if any are designed to provide the air flow needed to keep your card cool enough, and I am not aware of any third-party solutions that can do the trick.  At best I guess it will be thermal throttling a lot, and at worst its lifespan many be shortened.  In short, its performance will be particularly unpredictable.  If you try to bodge something together, use the micsmc utility to monitor the card temperature to make sure you are lowering it enough.

For workstation/desktop platforms, only Xeon Phi cards with active on-board cooling are likely to operate properly without overheating.

Sorry

Quote:

Charles Congdon (Intel) wrote:

Glad the BIOS helped. 

As for your Xeon Phi having no fan, as Tim says that means it is a card designed for a high-density server platform with external fans to provide sufficient cooling airflow for the motherboard, CPU, and any plug-in card.  I would not recommend using such a card in any workstation chassis I have seen so far - few if any are designed to provide the air flow needed to keep your card cool enough, and I am not aware of any third-party solutions that can do the trick.  At best I guess it will be thermal throttling a lot, and at worst its lifespan many be shortened.  In short, its performance will be particularly unpredictable.  If you try to bodge something together, use the micsmc utility to monitor the card temperature to make sure you are lowering it enough.

For workstation/desktop platforms, only Xeon Phi cards with active on-board cooling are likely to operate properly without overheating.

Sorry

Thanks, Charles. I would have chosen a custom designed computer case and board for the 5110P if I knew this in advance. For now, I have to think of a work-around plan so that I can start using the card on the machine I have. Since I'll primarily use the card for research purpose, I think I may be able to put a powerful external fan (in whatever form it takes) towards the card in order to get its temparature as low as could be.

Will get you guys updated if that works.

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