Questions regarding Purchasing a Fortran compiler.

Questions regarding Purchasing a Fortran compiler.

Hi all,

We are an academic group wishing to purchase a Fortran compiler as user-subroutine with ABAQUS. I have searched online and saw that Intel Fortran compiler 11.1+Microsoft visual studio 2008+ABAQUS 6.10 is potentially a compatible combination. We have already gotten our ABAQUS software however there are a few questions regarding the Fortran compiler that I'm not very clear of and wish to get some answers on. Please help me.

(1)    We have a total of 2 professors and about 8 students in our group. Do we have to purchase the 2-concurrent user academic + 8 students? Or do we have to purchase 1 academic and use it for the entire group?

(2)    Are the license good for lifetime? Or do we have to pay the renewal fee every year? Because it seems the renewal cost listed is for support service.

(3)    Suppose we have bought this. How many machines can we install? We each have our own computers in our lab and we need our computers to run different jobs at the same time. Would 1 license do it all for us? or multiple license for each machine?

So, anyone who have the answer to these questions please share. Much appreciated!

Best,

William

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Hello William,

I am transferring this issue to the Download, Licensing, and Registration forum. Someone on that forum will help you shortly.

Annalee

Single user licenses are meant only for one user so you would have to get 10 (2 for professors and 8 for students). However you could get a couple of floating licenses and do the same. I would suggest contacting a reseller to see what all your options are.

The licenses will allow you to use releases of the compiler up until your support expiration. Here is an example that should help explain this. You buy the compiler today 5/9/2013 and your license expires 5/9/2014. You can use any version of the compiler that came out before 5/9/2014. Even if the date is 12/25/2014 you are still able to use the compiler that was released on 5/9/2014.

A single user is only to be used by one person, not one machine but one user, so a single user license wont work for what you need, you can use a floating license for that. You can read more about licensing here http://software.intel.com/en-us/articles/licensing-faq

Did you have any other questions?

Regards,

Kenneth

Hi Kenneth and Anna,

Thanks a lot for your help!

Kenneth, i still have one question. What is the difference between buying a few floating license than buying 10 individual license for 10 users? How exactly does a floating license work?Thank you very much!

Best,

William

Quote:

Kenneth Craft (Intel) wrote:

Single user licenses are meant only for one user so you would have to get 10 (2 for professors and 8 for students). However you could get a couple of floating licenses and do the same. I would suggest contacting a reseller to see what all your options are.

The licenses will allow you to use releases of the compiler up until your support expiration. Here is an example that should help explain this. You buy the compiler today 5/9/2013 and your license expires 5/9/2014. You can use any version of the compiler that came out before 5/9/2014. Even if the date is 12/25/2014 you are still able to use the compiler that was released on 5/9/2014.

A single user is only to be used by one person, not one machine but one user, so a single user license wont work for what you need, you can use a floating license for that. You can read more about licensing here http://software.intel.com/en-us/articles/licensing-faq

Did you have any other questions?

Regards,

Kenneth

To use floating licences you have a FlexLM server (included) running on one machine on your network the OS of which doesn't matter (we have the server running on a Linux box). When you install the compiler the licence file refers to the server machine so that when the compiler runs it checks out a licence first if one is available; if both licences are in use the compile will fail. However a licene is only checked out for the duration of the compile - there is no latency - so in practice collisions will probably be rare.

This is an excellent option as long as your students aren't trying to build at the same time, but you'll only really know that when you try it. If you find that there is too much competition then I think you could go to five floating licences but you'd need to check that with your supplier.

Thanks buddy! I appreciate it!

Hi William are there any other questions I can answer for you?

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