GMP under Windows XP 32-bit using Core 2 Duo or Core 2 Quad

GMP under Windows XP 32-bit using Core 2 Duo or Core 2 Quad

I use the GNU Multiple Precision Arithmetic Library (GMP Lib) with the patch writen by Brian Gladman (http://www.gladman.me.uk).

To build this library, it use Assembly code.

I must use a Windows XP 32 bit. I build the library on a Core 2 Duo 2.5GHz (6Mo L2) using the Assembly code of the P4 (32-bit x86 architecture) and not the Core2 architecture because the Core2 need a 64-bit Windows and the device i must use provide only 32-bit driver. I made this because i think that there is a backward compatibility of the X86 Assembly code.

It works great and i passed all the tests and the benchmark.

My question is if i buy a new Core2 Quad processor, can i build my library using the same Assembly code or is it differences between Dual and Quad Core ?

I know verry little about Assembly code and CPU architecture.

Thanks for your response,

regards,

Pierre

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For more complete information about compiler optimizations, see our Optimization Notice.

Core 2 Quad and Core i7 continue to support 32-bit Windows (and linux, as well as 64-bit). You could run a 32-bit build of gmp under 64-bit OS as well. There are such builds available pre-built. In fact, the mingw compilers, both 32- and 64-bit, are using gmp.

Quoting - tim18
Core 2 Quad and Core i7 continue to support 32-bit Windows (and linux, as well as 64-bit). You could run a 32-bit build of gmp under 64-bit OS as well. There are such builds available pre-built. In fact, the mingw compilers, both 32- and 64-bit, are using gmp.

Thanks for your response. I don't use mingw or cygwin. I use Visual C++. I don't find binaries for windows XP. My benchmark tests with a Core2 Duo show that if i don't use the P4 assembly code, i have half benchmark score.

If i understand well: i can build the GMP lib using the Gladman patch and its P4 assembly code on Core 2 Duo or Core 2 Quad under 32-bit Windows. Is that correct ?

Regards,

Pierre

If you are relying on a special build which hasn't been accepted as part of the gnu code base, and are relying on discontinued versions of Visual Studio, which may not work on current or future versions of Windows, you may be correct in having doubts about the path forward. On the other hand, there's no imminent death for 32-bit Windows, and more people are running discontinued versions of Windows than supported versions on those CPUs. You've probably got a year at least before that situation may change significantly, due in part to obsolescence of those CPUs.

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