GMA 4500MHD and DVI-to-HDMI connection issues

GMA 4500MHD and DVI-to-HDMI connection issues

Hi,

I hope to be able to find an answer here as I've been unsuccessfully searching (and hacking the registry) for the past couple of weeks.

I've got a new Dell notebook (E6400) with GMA 4500MHD. I also have a 24" LG monitor that has VGA, HDMI and component connections. I was successfully using this monitor with my old HP laptop + docking station connected with DVI-HDMI cable, and getting full digital 1920x1200. The HP notebook had an ATI graphics card. However, with this new Dell notebook, I cannot get the DVI-to-HDMI connection (via the docking station) to work properly.

I do get it working using the VGA connection; however, the image quality is noticeably worse than the digital one. What happens when I connect using DVI-HDMI cable is that the Intel driver thinks that I connected a digital television rather than a monitor -- that's what I see when I bring up Intel Graphics Media Accelerator Driver for mobile, and look at Display Devices tab. I cannot switch to Monitor there. The image is not being fully displayed like I described in a thread here:

http://www.hardforum.com/showthread.php?t=1375680&highlight=4500MHD

I've tried searching the web for any possible links on how to fix that. It seems that some other people are having problems with Intel graphics and this monitor as seen here

http://www.hardforum.com/showthread.php?t=1167222&page=82

When modifying my monitor settings, I can choose either Full or Original display when connected in HDMI mode. For the former the monitor reports getting 480p signal and for the latter - the 1080p signal. Those are suited for televisions but I'm using a digital monitor rather than a television; therefore, I do think that the problem is with the driver since it should be sending 1200p signal.

I'm running the latest version of the driver which is 7.15.10.1608 for my OS (Vista Business x64). So is the driver too smart for its own good? A 3.5 year old HP laptop with an old ATI card can handle this and the latest Intel one cannot? I still have some hope that I can get this working, any suggestions/insights are greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

-- Alex

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Based on the thread you cite, looks like people are having problems with this monitor across the board (all three graphics vendors, to some extent).

What settings are you using in the DTDCalculator? Does the result show up as a selectable (1920x1200) resolution, or does it fail to show up at all?

Quoting - Aaron Brezenski (Intel)

Based on the thread you cite, looks like people are having problems with this monitor across the board (all three graphics vendors, to some extent).

What settings are you using in the DTDCalculator? Does the result show up as a selectable (1920x1200) resolution, or does it fail to show up at all?

Hi Aaron,

Thank you for a prompt response.

You're right, for all three graphics vendors this monitor was presented a challenge to some extent. In the case of my previous HP notebook with ATI graphics, once I installed Omega (3rd party) drivers, I was able to get everything working by choosing a checkbox on one of the Omega drivers pages. I haven't tried my desktop with nVidia card in it, but the consensus seems to be that with nVidia a simple registry change does the trick.

Now onto the questions about my current situation. I've put together a series of screenshots that I hope would create a better picture of what I'm facing.

This is how the image on the monitor comes up by default when connected via DVI-HDMI. I'm sorry the picture didn't come out very well, but the unused area of the monitor is primarily on the right and a bit on the bottom. With this setting the monitor responds as receiving 1080p signal.

Having switched from Full to Original, this is how the picture now looks:

Now the unused area of the monitor is on both sides and a bit on the bottom, with the monitor saying it's receiving a 480p signal.

Now, a couple of screenshots...

As you can see from these screenshots 1920x1200 is available, and is selected. The image is being sent to the monitor in its completeness as the screenshot shows; however, what I see on the monitor is only a 4x3 (rather than a 16x10) area with large black areas on each of the sides and a bit on the bottom -- I'm using the Original mode.

So, I'm guessing if I could force the driver to treat the connected monitor as a monitor rather than a television perhaps it can send a 1200p signal then.

Another interesting point... I was able to obtain the following two dumps from one of the utilities I was using in order to solve this (frankly, at this point I'm not sure which one I used as I used quite a few of them). The first dump is for this monitor's analog settings and the second for the digital ones. An interesting thing to note when comparing analog to digital settings is that 1920x1200 for digital is listed as 4x3, see below in bold red; however, its analog counterpart is 16x10.

I really appreciate your help.

Thanks,

-- Alex

---------- Analog -------------

Monitor
Model name............... L246WP
Windows description...... LG L246WP(Analog)
Manufacturer............. LGE
Plug and Play ID......... GSM563E
Serial number............ 70820
Manufacture date......... 2007, ISO week 3
-------------------------
EDID revision............ 1.3
Input signal type........ Analog 0.700,0.300 (1.0V p-p)
Sync input support....... Separate, Composite, Sync-on-green
Display type............. RGB color
Screen size.............. 520 x 320 mm (24.0 in)
Power management......... Standby, Suspend, Active off/sleep
Extension blocs.......... None
-------------------------
DDC/CI................... n/a

Color characteristics
Default color space...... Non-sRGB
Display gamma............ 2.20
Red chromaticity......... Rx 0.653 - Ry 0.337
Green chromaticity....... Gx 0.295 - Gy 0.607
Blue chromaticity........ Bx 0.144 - By 0.075
White point (default).... Wx 0.313 - Wy 0.329
Additional descriptors... None

Timing characteristics
Horizontal scan range.... 30-83kHz
Vertical scan range...... 56-75Hz
Video bandwidth.......... 170MHz
CVT standard............. Not supported
GTF standard............. Not supported
Additional descriptors... None
Preferred timing......... Yes
Native/preferred timing.. 1920x1200p at 60Hz (16:10)
Modeline............... "1920x1200" 154.000 1920 1968 2000 2080 1200 1203 1209 1235 +hsync -vsync
Detailed timing #1....... 1600x1200p at 60Hz (16:10)
Modeline............... "1600x1200" 162.000 1600 1664 1856 2160 1200 1201 1204 1250 +hsync +vsync

Standard timings supported
720 x 400p at 70Hz - IBM VGA
640 x 480p at 60Hz - IBM VGA
640 x 480p at 75Hz - VESA
800 x 600p at 60Hz - VESA
800 x 600p at 75Hz - VESA
1024 x 768p at 60Hz - VESA
1024 x 768p at 75Hz - VESA
1280 x 1024p at 75Hz - VESA
1600 x 1200p at 60Hz - VESA STD
1280 x 1024p at 75Hz - VESA STD
1680 x 1050p at 60Hz - VESA STD
1280 x 960p at 75Hz - VESA STD
1920 x 1080p at 60Hz - VESA STD
1400 x 1050p at 60Hz - VESA STD

Report information
Date generated........... 2008-12-15
Software revision........ 2.11.0.760
Raw data................. 00,FF,FF,FF,FF,FF,FF,00,1E,6D,3E,56,A4,14,01,00,03,11,01,03,0E,34,20,78,EA,5A,D5,A7,56,4B,9B,24,
......................... 13,50,54,A5,4B,00,A9,40,81,8F,B3,00,81,4F,D1,C0,90,40,01,01,01,01,28,3C,80,A0,70,B0,23,40,30,20,
......................... 36,00,06,44,21,00,00,1A,48,3F,40,30,62,B0,32,40,40,C0,13,00,06,44,21,00,00,1E,00,00,00,FD,00,38,
......................... 4B,1E,53,11,00,0A,20,20,20,20,20,20,00,00,00,FC,00,4C,32,34,36,57,50,0A,20,20,20,20,20,20,00,4A

----------- Digital ----------------

Monitor
Model name............... L246WP
Windows description...... LG L246WP(Digital)
Manufacturer............. LGE
Plug and Play ID......... GSM563F
Serial number............ 70820
Manufacture date......... 2007, ISO week 3
Filter driver............ monitor
-------------------------
EDID revision............ 1.3
Input signal type........ Digital
Color bit depth.......... Undefined
Display type............. RGB color
Screen size.............. 520 x 320 mm (24.0 in)
Power management......... Standby, Suspend, Active off/sleep
Extension blocs.......... 1 (CEA-EXT)
-------------------------
DDC/CI................... n/a

Color characteristics
Default color space...... Non-sRGB
Display gamma............ 2.20
Red chromaticity......... Rx 0.653 - Ry 0.337
Green chromaticity....... Gx 0.295 - Gy 0.607
Blue chromaticity........ Bx 0.144 - By 0.075
White point (default).... Wx 0.313 - Wy 0.329
Additional descriptors... None

Timing characteristics
Horizontal scan range.... 30-83kHz
Vertical scan range...... 56-75Hz
Video bandwidth.......... 170MHz
CVT standard............. Not supported
GTF standard............. Not supported
Additional descriptors... None
Preferred timing......... Yes
Native/preferred timing.. 1920x1200p at 60Hz (4:3)
Modeline............... "1920x1200" 154.000 1920 1968 2000 2080 1200 1203 1209 1235 +hsync -vsync
Detailed timing #1....... 1600x1200p at 60Hz (4:3)
Modeline............... "1600x1200" 162.000 1600 1664 1856 2160 1200 1201 1204 1250 +hsync +vsync

Standard timings supported
720 x 400p at 70Hz - IBM VGA
640 x 480p at 60Hz - IBM VGA
640 x 480p at 75Hz - VESA
800 x 600p at 60Hz - VESA
800 x 600p at 75Hz - VESA
1024 x 768p at 60Hz - VESA
1024 x 768p at 75Hz - VESA
1280 x 1024p at 75Hz - VESA
1600 x 1200p at 60Hz - VESA STD
1280 x 1024p at 75Hz - VESA STD
1680 x 1050p at 60Hz - VESA STD
1280 x 960p at 75Hz - VESA STD
1280 x 1024p at 60Hz - VESA STD

EIA/CEA-861 Information
Revision number.......... 3
DTV underscan............ Not supported
Basic audio.............. Supported
YCbCr 4:4:4.............. Supported
YCbCr 4:2:2.............. Supported
YCbCr 4:2:2.............. Supported
Native formats........... 1
Detailed timing #1....... 1920x1080p at 60Hz (16:10)
Modeline............... "1920x1080" 148.500 1920 2008 2052 2200 1080 1084 1089 1125 +hsync +vsync
Detailed timing #2....... 1920x1080i at 60Hz (16:10)
Modeline............... "1920x1080" 74.250 1920 2008 2052 2200 1080 1084 1094 1124 interlace +hsync +vsync
Detailed timing #3....... 1280x720p at 60Hz (16:10)
Modeline............... "1280x720" 74.250 1280 1390 1430 1650 720 725 730 750 +hsync +vsync
Detailed timing #4....... 720x480p at 60Hz (16:10)
Modeline............... "720x480" 27.000 720 736 798 858 480 489 495 525 +hsync +vsync
Detailed timing #5....... 1920x1080p at 50Hz (16:10)
Modeline............... "1920x1080" 148.500 1920 1936 2492 2640 1080 1084 1089 1125 +hsync +vsync

CE video data (timings supported)
1920 x 1080p at 60Hz - HDTV (16:9, 1:1) [Native]
1920 x 1080i at 60Hz - HDTV (16:9, 1:1)
1280 x 720p at 60Hz - HDTV (16:9, 1:1)
720 x 480p at 60Hz - EDTV (16:9, 32:27)
640 x 480p at 60Hz - Default (4:3, 1:1)
1920 x 1080p at 50Hz - HDTV (16:9, 1:1)
1920 x 1080i at 50Hz - HDTV (16:9, 1:1)
720 x 576p at 50Hz - EDTV (16:9, 64:45)
1280 x 720p at 50Hz - HDTV (16:9, 1:1)
NB: NTSC refresh rate = (Hz*1000)/1001

CE audio data (formats supported)
LPCM 2-channel, 16/20/24 bit depths at 32/44/48 kHz

CE speaker allocation data
Channel configuration.... 2.0
Front left/right......... Yes
Front LFE................ No
Front center............. No
Rear left/right.......... No
Rear center.............. No
Front left/right center.. No
Rear left/right center... No
Rear LFE................. No

CE vendor specific data (VSDB)
IEEE registration number. 0x000C03
CEC physical address..... 0.1.0.0
Maximum TMDS clock....... 165MHz

Report information
Date generated........... 2008-12-15
Software revision........ 2.11.0.760
Raw data................. 00,FF,FF,FF,FF,FF,FF,00,1E,6D,3F,56,A4,14,01,00,03,11,01,03,8E,34,20,78,EA,5A,D5,A7,56,4B,9B,24,
......................... 13,50,54,A5,4B,00,A9,40,81,8F,B3,00,81,4F,81,80,01,01,01,01,01,01,28,3C,80,A0,70,B0,23,40,30,20,
......................... 36,00,B0,44,11,00,00,1A,48,3F,40,30,62,B0,32,40,40,C0,13,00,B0,44,11,00,00,1E,00,00,00,FD,00,38,
......................... 4B,1E,53,11,00,0A,20,20,20,20,20,20,00,00,00,FC,00,4C,32,34,36,57,50,0A,20,20,20,20,20,20,01,F2,
......................... 02,03,1C,71,49,90,05,04,03,01,1F,14,12,13,23,09,07,07,83,01,00,00,65,03,0C,00,10,00,02,3A,80,18,
......................... 71,38,2D,40,58,2C,45,00,06,44,21,00,00,1E,01,1D,80,18,71,1C,16,20,58,2C,25,00,06,44,21,00,00,9E,
......................... 01,1D,00,72,51,D0,1E,20,6E,28,55,00,06,44,21,00,00,1E,8C,0A,D0,8A,20,E0,2D,10,10,3E,96,00,06,44,
......................... 21,00,00,1E,02,3A,80,D0,72,38,2D,40,10,2C,45,20,06,44,21,00,00,1E,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,BD

Okay, a couple of different things. First, I can only assume that the "ARC" screen you're selecting from is the one from the monitor's settings-- not the video driver or Windows driver, right?

If that is indeed the case, you should be setting it to "Original". "Full" would, if implementedcorrectly, beused in order to stretcha non-native resolution fill the screen.

Next, check the Aspect Ratio button in the Intel Drivers. What is that set to?

I can see why the two EDIDs are coming up with different aspect ratios:

VGA 1920x1200: 28 3C 80 A0 70 B0 23 40 30 20 36 00 06 44 21 00 00 1A
HDMI 1920x1200: 28 3C 80 A0 70 B0 23 40 30 20 36 00 B0 44 11 00 00 1A

The difference exists in the screen size bytes: for VGA, the screen size is listed as 518mm x 324mm (= 16/10). For HDMI, the size of the screen is listed as 432mm x 324mm (= 4/3). I'd be surprised if the drivers are using that to make their choice of aspect ratio, but it is possible.

If that is indeed the issue, and you're running Vista, Microsoft has providedthe ability to overwrite the EDID in the registry, but I don't know if Intel graphics drivers can use this method (not saying they can't, just that I have no data either way).

Quoting - Aaron Brezenski (Intel)

Okay, a couple of different things. First, I can only assume that the "ARC" screen you're selecting from is the one from the monitor's settings-- not the video driver or Windows driver, right?

If that is indeed the case, you should be setting it to "Original". "Full" would, if implementedcorrectly, beused in order to stretcha non-native resolution fill the screen.

Next, check the Aspect Ratio button in the Intel Drivers. What is that set to?

I can see why the two EDIDs are coming up with different aspect ratios:

VGA 1920x1200: 28 3C 80 A0 70 B0 23 40 30 20 36 00 06 44 21 00 00 1A
HDMI 1920x1200: 28 3C 80 A0 70 B0 23 40 30 20 36 00 B0 44 11 00 00 1A

The difference exists in the screen size bytes: for VGA, the screen size is listed as 518mm x 324mm (= 16/10). For HDMI, the size of the screen is listed as 432mm x 324mm (= 4/3). I'd be surprised if the drivers are using that to make their choice of aspect ratio, but it is possible.

If that is indeed the issue, and you're running Vista, Microsoft has providedthe ability to overwrite the EDID in the registry, but I don't know if Intel graphics drivers can use this method (not saying they can't, just that I have no data either way).

Aaron,

You're right ARC is the monitor's menu, and I do use Original (I showed Full just for demonstration).

In the Intel driver, I believe it's set to Maintain Aspect Ratio (I'll need to double check as I'm using the VGA connections now).

Following you noticing the discrepencies in the EDID for HDMI, I tried to change it in the registry; however, my change didn't "stick". I do have two entries for this monitor in the registry under HLMSystemCurrentControlSetEnumDisplayGSM563F. I changed EDID in both; however, it persisted upon reboot only in one of them.

But I do agree with you that it probably doesn't make a difference. I'd like to show a couple more images.

This one is the signal the monitor reports it's getting when I'm using my old HP notebook with ATI card:

As you can see in the top left corner of the monitor it reports HDMI 1920x1200/60Hz -- something I'd expect when communicating with a monitor.

The second image is the signal the monitor reports it's getting with the Intel driver:

As you can see it's reporting 1080p -- something that one would equate with a TV rather than a monitor. So, I believe the driver is too smart for its own good thinkging that if a device is connected via HDMI it must be a television, and is sending a signal suitable for that rather than a signal suitable for monitors.

Any idea if I can "modify" the registry to instruct the Intel driver either to eliminate "Digital Televison" from the set of devices, or give me an ability to utilize the dropdown in the driver such that it would give me a choice of Monitor or Digital Monitor?

Thanks,

-- Alex

Actually, "permanently" modifying the EDID is not as simple as changing ...EnumDisplay... You have to use the technique given here(only works with Vista, apparently).

I'm stumped that when you're selecting 1920x1200 you're getting 1080p out...? Don't see why that would ever be valid... unless it's sending a full 1920x1200 desktop but only letting you view 1920x1080 of it at once-- the so-called "scrolling desktop" of yesteryear. I'll admit I'm none-too-clear on what in the EDID is convincing the PC that your display is a TV rather than a Monitor. It's possible that's the culprit.

What happens if you change ...EnumDisplayGSM563F[whatever]Class to Monitor instead of Digital Television, and then change ...EnumDisplayGSM563F[whatever]ClassGUID to {4D36E96E-E325-11CE-BFC1-08002BE10318} (I don't know the ClassGUID for "Digital Monitor")? It might go away on reboot, unfortunately, but it's worth a shot.

Hi Aaron,

Sorry for the delayed response. I've been away for a couple of weeks. For some reason I cannot just reply to your latest post, I get page not found.

In any event, I'm going to try your latest suggestion later this week, and will let you know.

Thanks,

-- Alex

Hi!

I have a Dell Inspiron 1525 with GMA X3100 graphics and the same LG L246W monitor. This monitor works perfectly with an old desktop with an ATI Radeon 9600 card connected via DVI-HDMI cable. With the monitor connected to the laptop via HDMI-HDMI, I get the exact same problem as the original poster.

My theory is that the LG monitor thinks that a set-top box is connected when a modern chipset like the X3100 or 4500 connected via HDMI or DVI. The Intel drivers also detect the monitor as "Digital Television" rather than "Digital Display" because of this.

According to the LG instruction manual, the native resolution is not listed as a working resolution when connected to a set-top box. I'm pretty sure that the Intel chipset is sending out native resolution when asked, but the LG refuses to display it properly. When a DTV resolution such as 1280x720 is selected, it is centered on the screen, but overscaned with about 10% cut off all sides. Also, when connected to the Intel graphics, the options available in the monitor's OSD are completely different than when connected to the old DVI connected ATI.

I have already played around with EDID override INF files in Windows Vista. Using Entech's Moninfo program, I was able to make INF files to override the autodetected EDID information. While pressing the "Information" button in the Intel driver seems to show the EDID from the INF file, the monitor is still detected as a "Digital Television". I tried using EDID from Moninfo's generic 24 inch monitor description, the EDID from the LG's analog connection and from another brand of 24 inch monitor. I even took the LG's digital EDID and zeroed out the last 128 bytes and fixed the checksum of the first 128 bytes by hand. This removed the HDMI audio capabilites described in the last 128 bytes in the registry's version of the EDID. In all cases, the Intel driver still indicated "Digital Television" and there was no picture at all on the LG display.

I would like to request a control in the Intel drivers that allow the Intel chipset to behave as if a "Digital Display" is connected even if a "Digital Television" is detected. Unlike a traditional desktop monitor, there must another communication channel for monitor capabilites in addition to EDID. This addition negotiation must be putting the LG into DTV mode which does not allow it to work in native resolution.

While I hope the observations I have made above are correct, bear in mind that I am a novice. I hope I haven't led you astray.

Thank you...

Berton

is HDMI a TV or a monitor?
the connector type is how they figure out what kind of device it is
so if it reports a dvi connector i suspect it shows modes for a monitor
if its hdmi or component or something its a tv

I still haven't been able to play more to figure this out. However, it looks like Berton has done that already without any luck.

beercandy -- From what I understand HDMI connection doesn't (or shouldn't) necessarily imply that it's a DTV, more and more digital monitors have the HDMI inputs. The work that Berton's done seems to support your observation as well that the Intel drivers make a call based on the connection in use, and having detected the HDMI connection assume DTV without giving an option of going to digital monitor.

Besides waiting for the Intel driver to have Berton's suggestion implemented, I can see one more things that perhaps is worth trying. I wonder if the laptop/docking station is connected to the DVI switch with the HDMI/DVI or DVI/DVI cable respectively, and then DVI/HDMI cable is used to connect to the monitor from the DVI switch.

It would be interesting to see if that would "fool" the drivers. I'm thinking about something like this 2x1 Enhanced Powered DVI Switcher. Hopefully being powered this device will inform the drivers that they are connected via DVI. For the price of the switch I'm tempted to try as it's about 10% of what I paid for the monitor, and having the 2nd monitor (NEC 19") connected via DVI and seeing how much better the digital picture is, just causes me too much pain :)

-- Alex

or another problem could be that the dongle/adapter isnt up to spec and has the wrong resistor values on the wires and blocks the signals

beercandy
HDMI is a connector type used for TVs and other consumer electronics devices like set-top boxes and BluRay disc players. It is based on single link DVI. A DVI-HDMI cable is completely passive. On modern laptops like my Dell 1525, it is used to provide HDTV tv-out and digital monitor functionality. The LG monitor in question had a HDMI socket ONLY.

av17
I think that the LG L246W is mostly to blame for this problem. It is very picky even in analog mode about timing. Even 1280x800 is not supported at all! I've hooked my Dell to a generic 19 inch LCD and a Samsung DLP without any problems. On the Samsung, the HDMI audio works too. Back when this monitor was designed, (mine was built 2007 week 1) there was no such thing as graphics cards or chipsets with HDMI sockets and HDMI audio support. The monitor designer must have assumed that if an HDMI source was connected, the monitor should overscan like a TV. In the OSD under Screen/HDMI, there is a choice of TV vs PC. This looks like it should switch between behaving like a TV or monitor but changing it makes no difference with either my laptop or my working old PC.

I doubt a DVI switch would fool the connection because it is not supposed to interpret and relay the EDID information. In the home theatre installer realm, there are boxes that can store custom EDID info and fake the exchange between the two devices. I haven't even begun to research this area yet. Maybe this one?

http://www.gefen.com/kvm/dproduct.jsp?prod_id=4715

However, if the EDID override INF files I've tried are correct, they should provide the same fuctionality. Perhaps I'm not using them correctly?

To Intel driver support people:
Is there someone who knows the nitty gritty about HDMI handshaking and the interaction between the GPU and HDMI audio drivers that could shed some light on this? I know this problem seems to be specific to this monitor but more and more PCs will have HDMI plugs. More and more people will be pluging their PCs into their HDTVs. Soon, all desktop computer monitors will be using 16:9 aspect TV panels with funky new resolutions. Exposing more underlying low-level fuctionality in the video driver will at least allow people in discussion forums like this to unofficially support the problems that will arise. Even if we have to make registry edits or manually edit INI files, any help would be much appreciated.

Thank you...

Berton

Berton,

From your answer I can see that you know much more about these things than I do.

Do you think this DVI Doctor - Powered EDID Problem Solver will be helpful? Since you could override the EDID of the monitor have it go into this device, and then connect this device to the computer. Just wondering.

Thanks,

-- Alex

actually not all the pins are passive
the DDC pins have to use 5 volts
the hot plug pin uses a 5 volt signal
the way the monitor transmits the edid is though the ddc clock and data lines
if those lines dont provide enough voltage or the resisters are to high of a value it can interfere with transmitting the edid information correctly to the graphics chip
if the hot plug pin has the wrong resistor then when you plug in the monitor the os will never show it being connected

I've tried to read up on all this monitor stuff, but it is all new to me too....

EDID is the data describing the monitor capabilities sent over the DDC (Display Data Channel) pin on the DVI plug. The job of those boxes from Gefen and Monoprice is to capture the monitor capabilities and repeat them to the computer even if the monitor is turned off or connected with long wiring that doesn't support the DDC pin. This allows a PC to stay in the right video mode when booting up. The Gefen box is fancier, with some default DTV configurations available. The Monoprice unit according to user reviews there does not support HDCP (copy protection) which would screw up BluRay playback. Upon reflection, I have doubts that this will fix the problem.

From what I've read so far, DDC and the EDID seem to be for transmitting capabilities only, not controlling the monitor's behavior. What I have tried unsuccessfully so far with the INF files is to fool the GPU driver into thinking a different monitor is connected. The driver seems fooled, but the monitor is still in the wrong mode.

I hope someone who knows more about how HDMI works can give us some help. What other communications channel other that DDC might cause the monitor to be in the wrong mode? The CEC (Consumer Electronics Control) pin might be a candidate but the original poster's setup is DVI-HDMI which doesn't support the CEC pin.

av17
If that box from monoprice is cheap enough for you to consider, you could try saving the monitor's EDID first and and then cut off the DDC pins on the cable between the box and the monitor. Maybe if the monitor never receives a request for its EDID, it might not change to the wrong mode.

Thank you...

Berton

im just mentioning DDC because if you look at the edid data it says DDC/CI=N/a
kind of makes me think that the data may be incorrect since he can dump the edid data
another thing is my edid shows modes that say vesa standard timings
here is my edid if you want to try it (its a different monitor so who knows if it would work) but my monitor does have an hdmi connector
0x00,0xFF,0xFF,0xFF,0xFF,0xFF,0xFF,0x00,0x22,0x64,0x43,0x18,0x34,0x32,0x36,0x31,0x20,0x12,0x01,0x03,0x68,0x29,0x1A,0x78,0x2A,0x8A,0xA5,0xA4,0x53,0x4B,0x9D,0x24,0x14,0x4F,0x54,0xBF,0xEF,0x80,0x61,0x40,0x71,0x4F,0x81,0xC0,0x81,0x40,0x81,0x4F,0x81,0x80,0x95,0x0F,0x01,0x01,0x9A,0x29,0xA0,0xD0,0x51,0x84,0x22,0x30,0x50,0x98,0x36,0x00,0x99,0xFF,0x10,0x00,0x00,0x1C,0x00,0x00,0x00,0xFF,0x00,0x4F,0x48,0x4D,0x30,0x32,0x30,0x30,0x30,0x31,0x31,0x36,0x32,0x34,0x00,0x00,0x00,0xFD,0x00,0x38,0x4B,0x1E,0x50,0x0E,0x00,0x0A,0x20,0x20,0x20,0x20,0x20,0x20,0x00,0x00,0x00,0xFC,0x00,0x48,0x46,0x31,0x39,0x39,0x48,0x0A,0x20,0x20,0x20,0x20,0x20,0x20,0x00,0xD0

here is a driver that may resolve this problem
i think instead of using the edid it does something called bit bashing to figure out what is supported

http://www.intel.com/support/graphics/sb/cs-029955.htm

Quoting - beerandcandy

here is a driver that may resolve this problem
i think instead of using the edid it does something called bit bashing to figure out what is supported

http://www.intel.com/support/graphics/sb/cs-029955.htm

I just tried this driver, but the results are the same as with the original one.

Frankly, at this point I've given up -- it very well might be the monitors fault but I do hope that at some point a future release of the Intel driver will allow the user to select between digital monitor and digital television.

Thanks,

-- Alex

Yes, that driver doesn't use BitBashing instead of the EDID, it uses BitBashing to determine the EDID when it can't find a way to read it any other way.

Sorry we couldn't help your problem, av17.

Quoting - Aaron Brezenski (Intel)

Yes, that driver doesn't use BitBashing instead of the EDID, it uses BitBashing to determine the EDID when it can't find a way to read it any other way.

Sorry we couldn't help your problem, av17.

That's ok Aaron.

If I could just have a choice in the Intel graphics control panel to choose between digital monitor or digital TV, or even better force the driver to digital monitor :)

Anyways, thanks for your help.

-- Alex

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