Dirty Rotten Cheaters in the News, Late Summer 2008: It's A Small World After All...

Dirty Rotten Cheaters in the News, Late Summer 2008: It's A Small World After All...

Its a small world after all

1) Britain

Business school students in Britain are being scrutinized after scoretop.com offered prospective MBA students an opportunity to buy questions for the standard entry exam, called the Gmat. This happened before the FBI closed scoretop.com down in June 08: the site was run by a Chinese national living in the USA. After the servers hard drive was confiscated, the over 6,000 names listed on the drive seem to include names of students currently in British business schools. To date the Gmac folks have received more than a million pounds in copyright damages. Check it out:

http://ukpress.google.com/article/ALeqM5jWOvGCy7v0Tf9F-DpAr0ZQbd_WeQ

2) Tanzania

The National Examinations Council of Tanzania (NECTA) revealed recently some details about an epidemic of forgery with regard to academic certificates in enrollment for teacher training colleges there. (These are teachers who are taking classes for their own necessary credentials.) The report indicated that 529 out of the 8,421 candidates who applied for the Grade A teachers certificate this year registered with fake credentials, about 6% of the total. Some were using forged documents; others used certificates of students who had passed other examinations. Two candidates at one institution used certificates of dead people.

http://thecitizen.co.tz/newe.php?id=7121

3) Korea

The Seoul National University has given failing grades to 17 pre-med students who used their cell phones to cheat during finals. Further, the school ordered them to behave themselves and reflect on their wrongdoings. (I can hear the laughter of the 17 from here...) However, all 17 dirty rotten cheaters must take the class again next year.

http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/nation/2008/08/117_28816.html

4) The Caribbean

Two students pleaded guilty regarding having prior knowledge of and that means cheating on the Caribbean Advanced Proficiency Examination (CAPE) Communication Studies exam. The ruling magistrate intends to send a clear message when sentencing the two 18-year olds that cheating will not be tolerated.

The youths did not actually pay the $5000 asked for the early release of the exam, but admit talking face to face with the seller. Ten others have also been charged with having prior knowledge or larceny of the exam paper in the ordinary and advanced levels.

http://www.newsday.co.tt/news/0,83518.html

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