Is there a way to force the Scheme to load itself automatically?

Is there a way to force the Scheme to load itself automatically?

This is getting to be a nuisance. Every time I start this Dell Inspiron 530 I have to load the scheme lest the thing look screwy and I get messages of complaint from both the graphics card and the monitor.

The card does detect that the monitor wants 1680x1050 but tries to offer it with 75hz refresh rates which the monitor does not accept, so the monitor, VP2250wb, goes back to a lower res.

I've screwed around with the registry entries but that hasn't changed anything. There's nothing obvious in the BIOS either.

Notice in the below, that the IGMA thinks 75 is supported, but the user manual says otherwise and the monitor acts accordingly. Perhaps if there is a way to change the data the monitor sends the IGMA??

Thanks for reading this and even more thanks if you can figure out a solution.

Oh and I did call Dell. Their man in India said they couldn't help because I bought it at Best Buy. He said call the Geek Squad. Well guess what, they said I had to bring in the computer and monitor. CAN YOU IMAGINE ANYBODY ACTUALLY DOING THIS??? Sure, I'll drop it off so you can fool around with it for a week or two then you call me and tell you don't have a clue anyway. Oh brother. Sorry for the rant.

Intel Graphics Media Accelerator Driver Report

Report Date:08/01/2008
Report Time[hr:mm:ss]:22:03:50
Driver Version:7.15.10.1472
Operating System:Windows Vista Home Premium* , Service Pack 1 (6.0.6001)
Default Language:English
DirectX* Version:10.0
Physical Memory:4084 MB
Minimum Graphics Memory:8 MB
Maximum Graphics Memory:286 MB
Graphics Memory in Use:138 MB
Processor:Intel64 Family 6 Model 15 Stepping 13 GenuineIntel
Processor Speed:1995 MHZ
Vendor ID:8086
Device ID:29C2
Device Revision:02

* Accelerator Information *

Accelerator in Use:Intel G33/G31 Express Chipset Family
Video BIOS:1471.0
Current Graphics Mode:1680 by 1050 True Color (59 Hz)

* Devices Connected to the Graphics Accelerator *

Active Monitors: 1

* Monitor *

Monitor Name:ViewSonic VP2250wb
Display Type:Analog
Gamma Value:2.20
DDC2 Protocol:Supported
Maximum Image Size:Horizontal: 18.0 inches
Vertical: 11.0 inches
Monitor Supported Modes:
640 by 480 (60 Hz)
640 by 480 (67 Hz)
640 by 480 (72 Hz)
640 by 480 (75 Hz)
720 by 400 (70 Hz)
800 by 600 (56 Hz)
800 by 600 (60 Hz)
800 by 600 (72 Hz)
800 by 600 (75 Hz)
832 by 624 (75 Hz)
1024 by 768 (60 Hz)
1024 by 768 (70 Hz)
1024 by 768 (75 Hz)
1152 by 870 (75 Hz)
1280 by 960 (60 Hz)
1280 by 1024 (60 Hz)
1280 by 1024 (75 Hz)
1400 by 1050 (60 Hz)
1600 by 1200 (60 Hz)
1600 by 1200 (75 Hz)
1680 by 1050 (60 Hz)
168
0 by 1680 (60 Hz)
1680 by 1680 (75 Hz)
1920 by 1080 (60 Hz)

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The monitor tells the IGMA driver only 60Hz at 1680 x 1050. I don't see where those 75 Hz come from. The belong to other resolutions.

You can check the DDC2/EDID data the monitor sends to the PC also more detailed with this tool:
http://www.entechtaiwan.com/util/moninfo.shtm

--

Though I can't help you directly, I still have some suggestions:

. Your Dell Inspiron 530 as well as your display have DVI connectors. Please use those! You get a much more crisp image and your problem might vanish. Get a DVI cable. It transports the data to the display digitally without data loss.

. Yes there is a way to modify the data about the resolutions from the display to the IGMA. However you can expect the display to send correct data in 99.999999999% of all cases and you don't belong to the remaining 0.00000001 %.

. You have an old VideoBIOS (1471). Update to the latest BIOS of your Dell (it's 1.0.15 currently), which might include a more updated VideoBIOS. We had some real issues with old VBIOS and recent intel drivers here.

I don't see a DVI connector. Darn.

I ran that program, thanks. From that output it seems, if anything, IGMA is not paying attention to the monitor, or is otherwise unable to.

I just loaded the Dell BIOS, we'll see if that does anything.

Thanks for your reply!

Monitor
Windows description......... ViewSonic VP2250wb
Manufacturer description.... VP2250wb
Manufacturer................ ViewSonic

Plug and Play ID............ VSC5320
Serial number............... QQM080700334
EDID data source............ Registry (stored)

Manufacture date............ 2008, ISO week 7
EDID revision............... 1.3
Display type and signal..... Analog 0.700,0.300 (1.0V p-p)
Sync input support.......... Separate, Composite, Sync on green
Screen size................. 470 x 290 mm (~23")
Power management............ Active off/sleep

Color characteristics
Display gamma............... 2.20
Red chromaticity............ Rx 0.663 - Ry 0.331
Green chromaticity.......... Gx 0.198 - Gy 0.705
Blue chromaticity........... Bx 0.145 - By 0.064
White point (default)....... Wx 0.313 - Wy 0.329

Timing characteristics
VESA GTF support............ Not supported
Horizontal scan range....... 30-94kHz
Vertical scan range......... 50-75Hz
Video bandwidth............. 200MHz
Extension blocks............ n/a
Timing recommendation #1.... 1680x1050 at 60Hz
Modeline................ "1680x1050" 146.250 1680 1784 1960 2240 1050 1053 1059 1089 -hsync +vsync

Standard timings supported
640 x 480 at 60Hz - IBM VGA
640 x 480 at 67Hz - Mac II
640 x 480 at 72Hz - VESA
640 x 480 at 75Hz - VESA
720 x 400 at 70Hz - IBM VGA
800 x 600 at 56Hz - VESA
800 x 600 at 60Hz - VESA
800 x 600 at 72Hz - VESA
800 x 600 at 75Hz - VESA
832 x 624 at 75Hz - Mac II
1024 x 768 at 60Hz - VESA
1024 x 768 at 70Hz - VESA
1024 x 768 at 75Hz - VESA
1152 x 870 at 75Hz - Mac II
1280 x 960 at 60Hz - VESA
1280 x 1024 at 60Hz - VESA
1280 x 1024 at 75Hz - VESA
1400 x 1050 at 60Hz - VESA
1600 x 1200 at 60Hz - VESA
1600 x 1200 at 75Hz - VESA
1680 x 1050 at 60Hz - ViewSonic
1680 x 1680 at 60Hz - VESA
1680 x 1680 at 75Hz - VESA
1920 x 1080 at 60Hz - VESA

Raw EDID base
00: 00 FF FF FF FF FF FF 00 5A 63 20 53 01 01 01 01
10: 07 12 01 03 0E 2F 1D 78 2E FE 25 A9 54 32 B4 25
20: 10 50 54 BF EF 80 B3 00 B3 0F A9 4F A9 40 90 40
30: 81 80 81 40 D1 C0 21 39 90 30 62 1A 27 40 68 B0
40: 36 00 D1 23 11 00 00 1C 00 00 00 FF 00 51 51 4D
50: 30 38 30 37 30 30 33 33 34 0A 00
00 00 FD 00 32
60: 4B 1E 5E 14 00 0A 20 20 20 20 20 20 00 00 00 FC
70: 00 56 50 32 32 35 30 77 62 0A 20 20 20 20 00 60

Display adapter
Adapter description......... Intel G33/G31 Express Chipset Family
Adapter device ID........... 0x29C28086
Display settings............ 1680x1050, 32bpp

User/computer information
Registered user name........ Microsoft
Registered organization..... Microsoft
Windows version ............ Windows 2000
Windows build .............. 6.00.6001 Service Pack 1
Installation date .......... 1/1/1970 12:00:00 PM

I did the BIOS upgrade, you were correct, it was a 13, now I have a 15, but the video number did not change and it still runs at 75, such that the monitor balks.

Is there a way to change the EDID stuff such that the IGMA will only see 60 hz, and thus never bother with 75 at all?

* Accelerator Information *

Accelerator in Use:Intel G33/G31 Express Chipset Family
Video BIOS:1471.0
Current Graphics Mode:1680 by 1050 True Color (59 Hz)

That's strange that you don't see DVI connectors. I can see it from the monitor data sheet:
http://www.viewsonic.com/pdf/us_eng/products/VP2250wb-1_March_2008.pdf

Als well as from the tech specs for Dell Inspiron 530 and even images of it (white one):

Your monitor tells the perfectly fine resolution of 1680x1050@60Hz. And according to tech specs of the same monitor should also handle 85Hz. Something is odd, but I can't tell what.

billb211:Is there a way to change the EDID stuff such that the IGMA will only see 60 hz, and thus never bother with 75 at all?

Yes there is, but I'm not going to tell you. It's complicated and may result in a broken monitor if you do mistages and flash the wrong EDID information into the monitor.

If you can't get it to work, return one: Either the laptop or the monitor. But test first, which fault it is. Try to find the DVI if that's possible.

billb211:Video BIOS:1471.0

Current Graphics Mode:1680 by 1050 True Color (59 Hz)

This resolution is fine! It says that it displays 1680 x 1050. So what is wrong?

Do me a favour since your VBIOS is still old. Download this app:
http://hcidesign.com/memtest/
It's a memory test running in windows. Execute it and have it test your memory. If it doesn't fail within the first 10% of testing, then you're fine. Otherwise there's an incompatibility of VBIOS and drivers.

7oby:That's strange that you don't see DVI connectors. I can see it from the monitor data sheet:
http://www.viewsonic.com/pdf/us_eng/products/VP2250wb-1_March_2008.pdf

Als well as from the tech specs for Dell Inspiron 530 and even images of it (white one):

I do have the connector and jack for the monitor, the Dell however only has the blue connection. (VGA?) Seems like the same old connection I've been using since 89.

This resolution is fine! It says that it displays 1680 x 1050. So what is wrong?

Yes it does work properly, but that's because I have to set a "scheme" everytime I start the machine and after everyevent that changes the resolution.

I recommend Googling ResChange. Put it in your Startup and have it run on boot and change the rez to 1680x1050 @ 60Hz.

Another possibility is to disable Intel's Persistence algorithm and rely on Windows' default behavior. Sometimes the Persistence algorithm makes poor choices in optimal resolution. Let me know if you need help figuring out how to do this.

I did Google it and found it. Thanks. Over the past week I've googled a lot INCLUDING YOUR NAME! Yours were some of the first posts I read on this subject.

Where does Intel's Persistence algorithm live and how can I access it? Sounds interesting.

Meanwhile I've pretty much made the decision to take this back to Best Buy and exchange it for something that has the DVI connector.

There's a process called igfxpers.exe which gets started at boot time. By deleting the registry key which starts it up, you disable it.

In my system, it's found in

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREMicrosoftWindowsCurrentVersionRun

Persistence means well, and on my 945G laptop it works like a charm, but at some point when itgot moved into desktop space it started generating weird results sometimes. It's especially problematic with HDMI, but in your case it still might be a possible culprit.

I'll be darned, I did that (actually I renamed it) and restarted and lo and behold I didn't have to set the "scheme" !

Wow!!!!! Thanks a million.

Ok last question. Is it worth it to exchange this for a machine that has DVI output?

Depends on your usage needs. If you are trying to play Blu-ray on this machine, DVI might be better if it has HDCP protection-- but your monitor would have to have that as well, and I doubt it does.

For the vast majority of applications, analog VGA is still perfectly acceptable. You could have any of the standard "analog" issues with cabling or interference in the signalling, resulting in a worse picture than you'd achieve with a fully digital interface like DVI or HDMI... but if you are happy with the picture you're getting over VGA, you should stick to it, IMO.

In this case you are completely correct. I'd solved the problem, thanks to you yet went ahead and purchased a Dell XPS with a built in DVI output and guess what, the thing was DOA. Dead on arrival. I've just spent 4 hours with this box trying all sorts of disks and whatever else to get it to "boot" and NOTHING works. No video driver will load, the cable modem is not recognized, and one other thing comes up with a ? mark.

And this was a 400 dollar upgrade, plus tax, over the other machine. I should have stuck with it.

Makes me realize that humanity has reached some sort of tipping point. Things are too complex to be solved without heavy IQ intervention and the amount of heavy IQ is WAY short of sufficient.

THANKS again for all your help, you and 7oby!

To add insult to injury, I took the DOA machine back, the guy plugs it into a VGA monitor and it works just fine. I realize what's going on, but I take it bring it home put it back on the DVI (thinking maybe a normal shutdown "fixed" something) and sure enough, it's stuck again.

Then I try the VGA it it works just fine. Then I plug in the DVI, unplug the VGA and lo and behold it still works. I do a normal shutdown and try it again, whoops, it's back in nowhere land. Evidently Vista can handle it once it's running but the BIOS, well I guess that's a horse of a different color.

I suppose I can leave it on and have it "hibernate" I never had any luck with that in the WinME days, but who knows.

And BTW, since you guys are in the "know" can anybody explain why Vista is so different given that things like the registry have not changed much since Win95? Other than some visual fluff and some brand new nuisances like about a doubling of the things you have to click to get anywhere, sure seems the same to me.

Quoting - archibael

I recommend Googling ResChange. Put it in your Startup and have it run on boot and change the rez to 1680x1050 @ 60Hz.

Another possibility is to disable Intel's Persistence algorithm and rely on Windows' default behavior. Sometimes the Persistence algorithm makes poor choices in optimal resolution. Let me know if you need help figuring out how to do this.

Quoting - archibael

Thats Great

http://www.carbroker.org

Quoting - archibael

Depends on your usage needs. If you are trying to play Blu-ray on this machine, DVI might be better if it has HDCP protection-- but your monitor would have to have that as well, and I doubt it does.

For the vast majority of applications, analog VGA is still perfectly acceptable. You could have any of the standard "analog" issues with cabling or interference in the signalling, resulting in a worse picture than you'd achieve with a fully digital interface like DVI or HDMI... but if you are happy with the picture you're getting over VGA, you should stick to it, IMO.

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