Error in IDE integration of VS2008

Error in IDE integration of VS2008

netex1's picture

Intel C++ Compiler 10.1.020 with Visual Studio 2008
The following message showed up whenever I loaded a project:

The Intel C++ Compiler Integration Package, Tool Option ({477A1EE1-A43E-4250-A512-A0DF1F30891E}) did not load because of previous errors. For assistance, contact the package vendor. To attempt to load this package again, type 'devenv /resetskippkgs' at the command prompt.


I use the command line provided above, but a message box jumped up:

Package Load Failure
Package 'Intel C++ Compiler Integration Package, Tool Option' has failed to load properly ( GUID = {477A1EE1-A43E-4250-A512-A0DF1F30891E} ). Please contact package vendor for assistance ......

I have both VS2003 and VS2008 installed. VS2003 works well with ICC.

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Jennifer J. (Intel)'s picture

It seems the file is bad. Try this:


. rename this dir "C:Program FilesIntelCompilerVS IntegrationC++VS2008" to "C:Program FilesIntelCompilerVS IntegrationC++VS2008-save"


. copy dir "C:Program FilesIntelCompilerVS IntegrationC++VS2008-save" to "C:Program FilesIntelCompilerVS IntegrationC++VS2008"


. uninstall the IDE integration only


. reinstall the IDE integration.


If still doesn't work, do the following:


. uninstall the IDE integration.


. redownload a new pkg and install the IDE integration.

Igor Levicki's picture

Jennifer, I am having the same problem on Windows XP Professional x64 Edition SP2 and Visual Studio 2008. Although I am not sure what causes the problem I have noticed that your IDE install uses gacutil.exe instead of using Windows Installer a.k.a. MSI.

Proper way to do this is using Windows Installer to add those files where they should go. For more information on how to to it right, read this blog post by Aaron Stebner. I sincerely hope Intel will fix this soon.

EDIT:

I have looked into this further and I found the source of the problem after installation of Visual Studio 2008 I have uninstalled "Windows SDK for Visual Studio 2008 .Net Framework Tools" component because I thought I won't need it since I don't use .Net Framework at all in my projects and during installation of Visual Studio I have explicitly unchecked wherever I saw ".Net" with a checkbox next to it (you have probably guessed that I really hate .Net Framework by now).

Anyway, I have fixed the problem for me by reinstalling that particular component (WinSDK_NetFxTools.exe) from a DVD, but I had to extract it to a folder and run either WinSDK_nfxtoolsm_amd64.msi or WinSDK_nfxtoolsm_x86.msi manually because running the main executable did nothing.

Why does Intel Compiler Integration rely on that particular feature is really beyond me, because it is not a part of .Net Framework runtime and people who don't use .Net Framework are obviously tempted to promptly uninstall it.

Rant:

I hate .Net Framework for several reasons:

  1. You need to download and install .Net Framework runtime (only once but still it is a PITA if you have dial-up which you would be surprised how many people still have)
  2. .Net Framework wastes a lot of HDD space (compared to the size and featureset of the application which is using it)
  3. It has a shedload of small files taking a lot of time to install on older hardware and adding to the disk space fragmentation (and defragmentation) problem considerably
  4. It generates binaries during install taking 100% of the CPU time preventing you from doing any other usefull work while it installs
  5. It adds its own service contributing to the useless resource consumption. That service is a proof that .Net is a bloatware otherwise it wouldn't require it in the first place.
  6. It was meant to be a solution to the versioning problem but from the user standpoint it didn't solve that problem -- I still have to install .Net Framework 1.1, .Net Framework 2.0, .Net Framework 3.0, .Net Framework 3.5 and all the service packs and hotfixes to be able to use all .Net Framework based applications out there. So from 100+ MB we now come to 1+ GB of wasted space, 2+ services and counting.

This last point is also the most annoying one. At least when you have latest Java installed you don't need to install all older versions to be able to run older Java applications. Unfortunately, having all those .Net Framework runtimes (and now even Tools) has obviously became a requirement for developers even though some of us still don't (nor will ever) use darn .Net Framework.

End of rant.

-- Regards, Igor Levicki If you find my post helpfull, please rate it and/or select it as a best answer where applies. Thank you.
netex1's picture

I've tried uninstalling the VS integration only then installing it again, and redownload a new package and install again. None of them worked for me.


Is it because I also have VS2003 installed?


Thanks.


madjljiang:

It seems the file is bad. Try this:


. rename this dir "C:Program FilesIntelCompilerVS IntegrationC++VS2008" to "C:Program FilesIntelCompilerVS IntegrationC++VS2008-save"


. copy dir "C:Program FilesIntelCompilerVS IntegrationC++VS2008-save" to "C:Program FilesIntelCompilerVS IntegrationC++VS2008"


. uninstall the IDE integration only


. reinstall the IDE integration.


If still doesn't work, do the following:


. uninstall the IDE integration.


. redownload a new pkg and install the IDE integration.

Igor Levicki's picture

Haven't you read at least the first part of my post (before the rant)?

Here is what you should try:

  • Uninstall Intel Compiler Integration
  • Install Windows SDK for Visual Studio 2008 .Net Framework Tools (you can find it on a DVD, filename is WinSDK_NetFxTools.exe)
  • Install Intel Compiler Integration

Make sure that Windows SDK for Visual Studio 2008 .Net Framework Tools gets really installed. For me, just running WinSDK_NetFxTools.exe didn't install them for some reason. You can use file manager (such as Total Commander or Free Commander) or an archiver (WinRAR, WinZip, 7-Zip) to extract WinSDK_nfxtoolsm_x86.msi and WinSDK_nfxtoolsm_amd64.msi from WinSDK_NetFxTools.exe and run the appropriate package for your system.

-- Regards, Igor Levicki If you find my post helpfull, please rate it and/or select it as a best answer where applies. Thank you.
netex1's picture

I downloaded "6.0.6001.16621.148.WindowsSDK_LonghornServer_IDS04_idw.WindowsSDK.DVD.Release.iso", then extracted the following files:


WinSDKNetFxTools-SDK_WinFX_BIN_BLD-common.0.cab


WinSDKNetFxTools-WinSDKNetFxTools-common.0.cab


WinSDKNetFxTools-x86.msi


WinSDKNetFxTools-ia64.msi


andinstalled the corresponding msi, uninstalled then reinstalled the Intel C++ Compiler integration. It now works. Thanks Igor!


I strongly recommended Intel to include those files in next release. A lot of non-dotNET developers like me don't install the NetFxTools and don't even want to.


Jennifer J. (Intel)'s picture

Thanks Igor for finding the solution for this issue. It's in our tracker now.

Igor Levicki's picture

Oh, you didn't find those on a Visual Studio 2008 DVD? Never mind, you needed Platform SDK anyway (which is no longer part of Visual Studi) or you would not be able to build Windows applications.

Jennifer, you are welcome, but the issue still stands &mdash Intel Compiler IDE Integration functionality relies on a feature which is not present in .Net Framework runtime redistributable. I would like to see that corrected, not just "in your tracker".

-- Regards, Igor Levicki If you find my post helpfull, please rate it and/or select it as a best answer where applies. Thank you.
Iliyan Georgiev's picture

Igor, cool down...

Igor Levicki's picture

I am cool. Btw, since I am subscribed to this thread I saw your original post as well. Once you say something (unless you have made a mistake and you edit to correct the facts) try sticking to it, at least it looks honest and professional.

As for me hating this or wanting that my hate is rational and it is directed towards in my opinion poorly thought out product (.Net Framework), not the person or the company, and I believe my wants are in the best interest of all Intel customers.

In this particular case Intel developers are making two mistakes:

  • They do not use MSI instead of gacutil.exe to install assemblies meaning their application setup relies on features not present in .Net Framework runtime.
  • Their application also relies on features not present in .Net Framework runtime.

Why am I suddenly considered rude if I want that fixed? That would cut their support costs and make the comiler integration Vista compliant so it is in their interest as well.

-- Regards, Igor Levicki If you find my post helpfull, please rate it and/or select it as a best answer where applies. Thank you.
Iliyan Georgiev's picture

Well, I edited my post because I was under affection when I originally wrote it. But then I cooled down :-)

Anyway, ICC is a great compiler, but a bit buggy and with poor documentation. I also think this issue should be fixed soon.

Jennifer J. (Intel)'s picture

Thanks all for reporting all the issues and even with solutions. We'll try to fix them as soon as we could. Documentation will be improved a lot in the next major release.


Please feel free to ask any questions here or to Premier Support.

Igor Levicki's picture

I have just opened an issue with Premier Support for this, since Intel seems uninterested in fixing it on their own.

-- Regards, Igor Levicki If you find my post helpfull, please rate it and/or select it as a best answer where applies. Thank you.
Jennifer J. (Intel)'s picture
Hello,
With our 11.0 release, the 11.0.066 update or newer has fixed the dependency on "gacutil.exe".
Also the Parallel Composer beta does not use "gacutil.exe" as well.

Thanks,
Jennifer

kruppa.laszlo@chello.hu's picture

Good morning!

I am glad I have found this Forum, and it is an honor for me to write here.

For some reason I am tied to the previous version of the Intel C compiler (it is 10.1.029, and unfortunately will remain this for some time), and have run into the same problem with my brand new VS2008. To make things even worse I have Vista Business 64-bit, therefore I can't just copy the steps described in your spring-entries. I am still trying hard, but would really greatly appreciate some hints form a more experienced colleague.

Thanks, and best regards!

Laszlo

Jennifer J. (Intel)'s picture
Quoting - kruppa.laszlo@chello.hu

For some reason I am tied to the previous version of the Intel C compiler (it is 10.1.029, and unfortunately will remain this for some time), and have run into the same problem with my brand new VS2008. To make things even worse I have Vista Business 64-bit, therefore I can't just copy the steps described in your spring-entries.

I found several other methods to register assemblies -
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dkkx7f79.aspx .Try the 3rd and 4th methods:

  • Using a Windows shell extension provided by the Windows Software Development Kit (SDK) called the Assembly Cache Viewer (Shfusion.dll).

    The shell extension allows you to drag assemblies into the global assembly cache.

  • Using the .NET Framework Configuration Tool (Mscorcfg.msc).

    Jennifer

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