Troubleshooting and Tips

Running into issues with any of the steps in this Get Started with the Intel® Edison Development Board on Linux* guide?

Do you have a different OS?
Refer to the Troubleshooting and Tips for Windows* 64-bit, Windows* 32-bit, or Mac OS X*.

  1. Scan the topics on this page for common issues, solutions, and tips.
  2. Search for additional issues in Intel® Edison Board Platform Support.

  3. Search the Support Community for the Intel® Edison board. You can also post your questions to the community forum.


What external power supply should be used with the Arduino* expansion board?

Use a direct current (DC) power supply rated as follows:
  • 7-15 V DC
  • At least 1500mA
  • Center/inner pin is positive pole

For more details on using external power, refer to the Connecting Cables appendix article for the Arduino* expansion board.


I don't have access to a DC power supply.

In many cases, you can use the device mode micro USB cable to power your board.

Side-by-side example of connecting to the device mode port on the Arduino* expansion board and the mini breakout board

With the Arduino* expansion board (shown on the left), data transfer occurs over the top micro USB connector. With the mini breakout board (right), it is the bottom micro USB connector.

However, if you are using only the device mode micro USB cable for power and you are experiencing unexpected behavior, your computer's USB port may not be reliably supplying power to the board.

Things you can try:
  • If you are connecting the board to a laptop, plug in your laptop’s AC adapter.
  • Use a powered USB hub.

The setup tool is not detecting my board.

Follow these debugging steps in the order shown:

  1. Is the Intel® Edison compute module securely seated on the breakout board?

    A loosely connected Intel® Edison compute module will produce unexpected behaviors. Press firmly down on the Intel® Edison compute module just below the words “What will you make?” to ensure the compute module is connected to your board.

    Examples of Intel® Edison compute module seated improperly and properly

  2. Is your Intel® Edison board powered on?

    A green LED indicator should light up and stay lit when the device mode and/or DC power supply cables are connected. View details for the Arduino* expansion board or the mini breakout board.

  3. Do you have the device cable connected?

    Connect a micro-B type USB cable to the device mode micro USB port of your Intel® Edison breakout board and the other end to your computer.

    Side-by-side example of connecting to the device mode port on the Arduino* expansion board and the mini breakout board

    With the Arduino* expansion board (shown on the left), data transfer occurs over the top micro USB connector. With the mini breakout board (right), it is the bottom micro USB connector.

  4. Is your board in device mode?

    If you are working with an Arduino* expansion board, the microswitch should be toggled down towards the two micro USB ports.

    Photographic diagram for setting the microswitch for device mode

    If you are working with a mini breakout board, it has a single USB 2.0 interface. The mini breakout board will automatically switch into device mode when a USB cable with a micro-B connector is used.

    Example of micro-B USB cable used for device mode

  5. Add additional power.

    If you are using only the device mode micro USB cable for power and you are experiencing unexpected behavior, your computer's USB port may not be reliably supplying power to the board.

    Things you can try:
    • If you are connecting the board to a laptop, plug in your laptop’s AC adapter.
    • Use a powered USB hub.
    • Use an external DC power supply. Refer to the Connecting Cables appendix page for the Arduino* expansion board or mini breakout board for more details.
  6. Try a different micro USB cable and/or computer USB port.

    It is not uncommon for unexpected behaviors to occur due to bad or incompatible USB cables or USB ports. For example:

    • Some micro USB cables are meant for charging only and cannot communicate data between the Intel® Edison board and a computer.

    • If the Intel® Edison board is plugged into a USB 3.0 port, you may experience some issues with it not being powered correctly. In that case, use a DC power supply for your board, or try putting a USB 2.0 hub (preferably powered) in between your computer and your Intel® Edison board.


I don't know the password for my board.

There is no way to recover a lost password set on an Intel® Edison board. If you do not know the password, you will need to re-flash the firmware on the board in order to re-gain access.

To flash your board, follow the steps in Step 2: Run Setup Tool. Afterwards, you'll need to set a new device password and name on your Intel® Edison board. You can always update your password by running the configure_edison --password command again — but only if you are already logged into the board.


The setup tool cannot flash my board.

Due to many factors (although mainly related to USB drivers), sometimes the setup tool cannot flash your board.

Intel® Edison board did not update warning message

If you get an error message about an unsuccessful image update while using the setup tool, use the manual process for flashing your board below.


How do I update/flash the Intel® Edison board firmware manually?

Running the setup tool is the preferred method for flashing the firmware onto an Intel® Edison board, however there are times where you must manually copy files and run scripts in order to flash your board.

This process uses dfu-util, an open source program that implements the USB DFU (USB Device Firmware Upgrade) protocol.

  1. Download the pre-built Yocto* complete image from software.intel.com/iot/hardware/edison/downloads listed under the "Intel® Edison Board Firmware Software Release" heading.

  2. Extract the contents of the downloaded ZIP file into a new folder such as edison-iotdk-image.

  3. Open Terminal.

  4. In Terminal, install dfu-util using the apt-get install command.

    $ sudo apt-get install dfu-util

    If you see messages indicating that these tools are already installed, continue to the next step.

  5. Use the command line to navigate to the folder you extracted the firmware image to. For example:

    $ cd ~/Downloads/edison-iotdk-image

  6. Run the flashall script, and then follow the onscreen prompts.

    $ sudo ./flashall.sh

  7. When requested by the script, plug in your board to your computer using the device mode cable.

    Using device mode
    On the Arduino* expansion board: The microswitch is toggled down towards the two micro USB ports. A USB cable with a micro-B type connector can now be plugged into the top micro USB port, and the other end plugged into your computer.

    Device mode for mini breakout board
    On the mini breakout board: Plug in a USB cable with a micro-B type connector, and plug the other end into your computer.

  8. The flashall script can take up to 5 minutes to complete the flashing process.

    Do not power off or unplug your board during the flashing process
    Unless requested by the script, interrupting the flashing process by unplugging the power cable may leave your board in a non-working state.

Once flashing is complete, you will need to repeat Step 3: Connect over UART (serial) and Step 4: Run configure_edison.


My board stopped responding.

If your board stops responding and you cannot get your Intel® Edison board to reboot, you may need to re-flash the firmware on the board to reset it back to a working state.

To flash your board, follow the steps in Step 2: Run Setup Tool.


Close Screen sessions every time you are done with your serial connection.

Failing to close the Screen connection fully may stop you from being able to log in next time without rebooting the Intel® Edison board. Close Screen sessions every time you are done with your serial connection.

To end a Screen session, type Ctrl + A, and then Ctrl + D.

Killing a screen session


Which USB device dev path should be used for making UART (serial) connections?

For the majority of the time, the USB device dev path will be /dev/ttyUSB0 when your Intel® Edison board is plugged into your computer. However, if you have multiple USB serial devices connected, your Intel® Edison board could be assigned ttyUSB1, or ttyUSB2.

To list all connected USB serial connections, in Terminal run the following command:

$ ls /dev/ttyUSB*

If there are multiple ttyUSB devices, try using screen to connect to any of them. Or run ls /dev/ttyUSB* both before and after connecting your Intel® Edison board to your computer to see which ttyUSB dev path updates.

If you see a "cannot access /dev/ttyUSB*" message, no USB serial devices were detected. Continue with There is no /dev/ttyUSB0 device in Terminal below.

No connected USB serial devices


There is no /dev/ttyUSB0 device in Terminal.

Follow these debugging steps in the order shown:

  1. Is the Intel® Edison compute module securely seated on the breakout board?

    A loosely connected Intel® Edison compute module will produce unexpected behaviors. Press firmly down on the Intel® Edison compute module just below the words “What will you make?” to ensure the compute module is connected to your board.

    Example of Intel® Edison compute module seated improperly and properly.

  2. Is your Intel® Edison board powered on?

    A green LED indicator should light up and stay lit when the device mode and/or DC power supply cables are connected. View details for the Arduino* expansion board or the mini breakout board.

  3. Do you have the UART/serial cable connected?

    Connect a micro-B type USB cable to the UART/serial micro USB port of your Intel® Edison breakout board and the other end to your computer.

    Side-by-side example of connecting to the UART/serial port on the Arduino* expansion board and the mini breakout board

    With the Arduino* expansion board (shown on the left), serial communication occurs over the bottom micro USB connector. With the mini breakout board (right), it is the top micro USB connector.


Which serial port should be used with the Arduino* IDE?

Try one of the /dev/ttyACM entries displayed in the Arduino* IDE Port dropdown.

Do not confuse /dev/ttyACM0 for dev/ttyUSB0.
The ttyACM0 entry is the Multifunction Composite Gadget port used for programming using the Arduino* IDE, while the ttyUSB entry is used for UART/serial connections.

A step-by-step guide is outlined in Blinking an LED with the Arduino* IDE.

Port dropdown in the Arduino* IDE


There is no /dev/ttyACM0 device related to the Intel® Edison listed in the Arduino* IDE

Follow these debugging steps in the order shown:

  1. Are you using a breakout board that is different than the Arduino* expansion board or the mini breakout board?

    Additional USB drivers may need to be installed. Please refer to the manufacturer of your breakout board.

  2. The remaining debugging steps are the same as The setup tool is not detecting my board. Continue there.


Toggle Wi-Fi* on and off using ifconfig.

Having problems connecting to a Wi-Fi* network using configure_edison --wifi? Try running the following commands in a serial communication session with your board:

$ ifconfig usb0 down
$ ifconfig wlan0 down
$ ifconfig usb0 up
$ ifconfig wlan0 up

Then run the Wi-Fi* configuration wizard again:

configure_edison --wifi


Use the Wi-Fi* command line interface (wpa_cli) to connect to a network.

Are you having problems connecting to a Wi-Fi* network using configure_edison --wifi? Try using the Wi-Fi* command line interface (wpa_cli) to set up Wi-Fi*. Read about it in Connecting to a Wireless Network via Linux* for Intel® Edison Board.


What is the IP address of my board?

After running configure_edison --wifi and successfully connecting to a Wi-Fi* network, you will be shown your IP address in the Done message.

Done message after using the --wifi option

To get the current Wi-Fi* IP address of your board without going through the setup process again, run the following command:

$ configure_edison --showWiFiIP

The IP address for the Wi-Fi* interface will be shown on the shell.

Using the --showWiFiIP option

Alternatively, enter the command:

$ ifconfig

Then look for the wlan0 IP address show as inet addr.

Example of an IP address using ifconfig


How do I know if my Intel® Edison board is online and accessible?

To verify that your Intel® Edison board is online, you can try:

  1. From the Intel® Edison board's shell, ping a publicly accessible domain such as google.com and wait for a response.

    $ ping google.com

    (Use the Ctrl+C keyboard command to exit the ping process.)

You can try a few things to verify that your Intel® Edison board is accessible:

  1. View the built-in status web page running on your Intel® Edison board by visiting the IP address in a web browser on another computer (or mobile phone) on the same Wi-Fi* network.

    Example of message displayed when successfully connected to a network

    For example, using the example above, visit http://10.0.1.11 or http://edison.local in a web browser, where the IP address was 10.0.1.11 and the device name was "edison").

  2. Using Command Prompt or Terminal, ping your board from another computer on the same network using the IP address obtained above.

    $ ping 10.0.1.11

    (Use the Ctrl+C keyboard command to exit the ping process.)

Note: Many large companies have strict Internet security policies and restrict direct IP address access of computers and devices that are on the same internal network. Check with your system administrator if you have issues.
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