Notational Conventions

Information in this documentation applies to all supported operating systems and architectures unless otherwise specified.

This documentation uses the following conventions:

Notational Conventions

THIS TYPE

Indicates statements, data types, directives, and other language keywords. Examples of statement keywords are WRITE, INTEGER, DO, and OPEN.

this type

Indicates command-line or option arguments, new terms, or emphasized text. Most new terms are defined in the Glossary.

This type

Indicates a example code.

This type

Indicates what you type as input.

This type

Indicates menu names, menu items, button names, dialog window names, and other user-interface items.

File > Open

Menu names and menu items joined by a greater than (>) sign indicate a sequence of actions. For example, "Click File > Open" indicates that in the File menu, click Open to perform this action.

{value | value}

Indicates a choice of items or values. You can usually only choose one of the values in the braces.

[item]

Indicates items that are optional. Brackets are also used in code examples to show arrays.

item [, item ]...

Indicates that the item preceding the ellipsis (three dots) can be repeated. In some code examples, a horizontal ellipsis means that not all of the statements are shown.

Intel Fortran

This term refers to the name of the common compiler language supported by the Intel® Fortran Compiler.

Windows* OS

Windows operating system

These terms refer to all supported Microsoft* Windows* operating systems.

Linux* OS

Linux operating system

These terms refer to all supported Linux* operating systems.

OS X*

OS X operating system

These terms refer all supported OS X* operating systems.

Microsoft Visual Studio*

An asterisk at the end of a word or name indicates it is a third-party product trademark.

compiler option

This term refers to Windows* OS options, Linux* OS options, or OS X* options that can be used by the compiler to compile applications.

Many options have names that are the same on Linux* OS, OS X*, and Windows* OS, except for an initial Q at the start of the Windows name. Within text, such option names are shown as [Q]option-name.

For example, consider we are describing information about the -ip option (Linux* OS and OS X*) and the /Qip option (Windows* OS). Instead of listing both names separately, you will see [Q]ip.

Whenever you see the [Q]option-name convention used, it means that the Linux* OS and OS X* form (if applicable) of the option is -option-name and the Windows* OS form of the option is /Qoption-name.

Compiler option names that are more dissimilar are shown in full.

Conventions Used in Compiler Options

/option or
-option

A slash before an option name indicates the option is available on Windows OS. A dash before an option name indicates the option is available on Linux* OS and OS X* systems. For example:
Windows* OS option: /fast
Linux* OS and OS X* option: -fast
Note: If an option is available on Windows* OS, Linux* OS, and OS X* systems, no slash or dash appears in the general description of the option. The slash and dash will only appear where the option syntax is described.

/option:argument or
-option argument

Indicates that an option requires an argument (parameter). For example, you must specify an argument for the following options:
Windows* OS option: /Qdiag-error-limit:n
Linux* OS and OS X* option: -diag-error-limit n

/option:keyword or
-option keyword

Indicates that an option requires one of the keyword values.

/option[:keyword ] or
-option [keyword ]

Indicates that the option can be used alone or with an optional keyword.

option[n] or option[:n] or option[=n]

Indicates that the option can be used alone or with an optional value; for example, in /Qfnalign[:n] and -falign-functions[=n], the n can be omitted or a valid value can be specified for n.

option[-]

Indicates that a trailing hyphen disables the option; for example, /Qglobal_hoist- disables the Windows* OS option /Qglobal_hoist.

[no]option or
[no-]option

Indicates that "no" or "no-" preceding an option disables the option. For example:
In the Windows* OS option /[no]traceback, /traceback enables the option, while /notraceback disables it.
In the Linux* OS and OS X* option -[no-]global_hoist, -global_hoist enables the option, while -no-global_hoist disables it.
In some options, the "no" appears later in the option name; for example, -fno-alias disables the -falias option.

Conventions Used in Language Reference

This color

Indicates extensions to the Fortran 2003 and Fortran 2008 Standards. These extensions (non-standard features) may or may not be implemented by other compilers that conform to the language standard.

Fortran

This term refers to language information that is common to previously supported Fortran standards, Fortran 2003, and the Intel® Fortran Compiler.

Standard Fortran

This term refers to language information that is common to ANSI/ISO Fortran 95, ANSI/ISO Fortran 90, and Intel Fortran.

Fortran 95

This term refers to language features specific to ANSI/ISO Fortran 95.

Fortran 2003

This term refers to language features specific to ANSI/ISO Fortran 2003.

Fortran 2008

This term refers to language features specific to ISO/IEC 1539-1:2010 (Fortran 2008).

integer

This term refers to the INTEGER(KIND=1), INTEGER(KIND=2), INTEGER (INTEGER(KIND=4)), and INTEGER(KIND=8) data types as a group.

real

This term refers to the REAL (REAL(KIND=4)), DOUBLE PRECISION (REAL(KIND=8)), and REAL(KIND=16) data types as a group.

REAL

This term refers to the default data type of objects declared to be REAL. REAL is equivalent to REAL(KIND=4), unless a compiler option specifies otherwise.

complex

This term refers to the COMPLEX (COMPLEX(KIND=4)), DOUBLE COMPLEX (COMPLEX(KIND=8)), and COMPLEX(KIND=16) data types as a group.

logical

This term refers to the LOGICAL(KIND=1), LOGICAL(KIND=2), LOGICAL (LOGICAL(KIND=4)), and LOGICAL(KIND=8) data types as a group.

< Tab>

This symbol indicates a nonprinting tab character.

^

This symbol indicates a nonprinting blank character.

Platform Labels

A platform is a combination of operating system and central processing unit that provides a distinct environment in which to use a product (in this case, a computer language). An example of a platform is Microsoft* Windows* OS on processors using IA-32 architecture.

In this documentation, information applies to all supported platforms unless it is otherwise labeled for a specific platform (or platforms).

These labels may be used to identify specific platforms:

L*X

Applies to Linux* OS on processors using IA-32 architecture and and Intel® 64 architecture.

M*X

Applies to OS X* operating system software on processors using IA-32 architecture and Intel® 64 architecture.

W*S

Applies to Microsoft Windows* OS on processors using IA-32 architecture and Intel® 64 architecture.

i32

Applies to 32-bit operating systems on IA-32 architecture.

i64em

Applies to 32-bit operating systems on Intel® 64 architecture and Intel® Many Integrated Core Architecture (Intel® MIC Architecture).

i64em_mic

Applies to 32-bit operating systems on Intel® 64 architecture targeting Intel® Many Integrated Core Architecture (Intel® MIC Architecture).

For more complete information about compiler optimizations, see our Optimization Notice.