Notational Conventions

Information in this documentation applies to all supported operating systems and architectures unless otherwise specified.

This documentation uses the following conventions:

Notational Conventions

this type

Indicates command-line or option arguments.

This type

Indicates a example code.

This type

Indicates what you type as input.

This type

Indicates menu names, menu items, button names, dialog window names, and other user-interface items.

File > Open

Menu names and menu items joined by a greater than (>) sign indicate a sequence of actions. For example, "Click File > Open" indicates that in the File menu, click Open to perform this action.

{value | value}

Indicates a choice of items or values. You can usually only choose one of the values in the braces.

[item]

Indicates items that are optional.

item [, item ]...

Indicates that the item preceding the ellipsis (three dots) can be repeated.

Windows* OS

Windows operating system

These terms refer to all supported Microsoft* Windows* operating systems.

Linux* OS

Linux operating system

These terms refer to all supported Linux* operating systems.

OS X*

OS X operating system

These terms refer all supported OS X* operating systems.

Microsoft Visual Studio*

An asterisk at the end of a word or name indicates it is a third-party product trademark.

compiler option

This term refers to Windows* OS options, Linux* OS options, or OS X* options that can be used by the compiler to compile applications.

Many options have names that are the same on Linux* OS, OS X*, and Windows* OS, except for an initial Q at the start of the Windows name. Within text, such option names are shown as [Q]option-name.

For example, consider we are describing information about the -ip option (Linux* OS and OS X*) and the /Qip option (Windows* OS). Instead of listing both names separately, you will see [Q]ip.

Whenever you see the [Q]option-name convention used, it means that the Linux* OS and OS X* form (if applicable) of the option is -option-name and the Windows* OS form of the option is /Qoption-name.

Compiler option names that are more dissimilar are shown in full.

Conventions Used in Compiler Options

/option or
-option

A slash before an option name indicates the option is available on Windows OS. A dash before an option name indicates the option is available on Linux* OS and OS X* systems. For example:
Windows* OS option: /fast
Linux* OS and OS X* option: -fast
Note: If an option is available on Windows* OS, Linux* OS, and OS X* systems, no slash or dash appears in the general description of the option. The slash and dash will only appear where the option syntax is described.

/option:argument or
-option argument

Indicates that an option requires an argument (parameter). For example, you must specify an argument for the following options:
Windows* OS option: /Qdiag-error-limit:n
Linux* OS and OS X* option: -diag-error-limit n

/option:keyword or
-option keyword

Indicates that an option requires one of the keyword values.

/option[:keyword ] or
-option [keyword ]

Indicates that the option can be used alone or with an optional keyword.

option[n] or option[:n] or option[=n]

Indicates that the option can be used alone or with an optional value; for example, in /Qfnalign[:n] and -falign-functions[=n], the n can be omitted or a valid value can be specified for n.

option[-]

Indicates that a trailing hyphen disables the option; for example, /Qglobal_hoist- disables the Windows* OS option /Qglobal_hoist.

[no]option or
[no-]option

Indicates that "no" or "no-" preceding an option disables the option. For example:
In the Windows* OS option /[no]traceback, /traceback enables the option, while /notraceback disables it.
In the Linux* OS and OS X* option -[no-]global_hoist, -global_hoist enables the option, while -no-global_hoist disables it.
In some options, the "no" appears later in the option name; for example, -fno-alias disables the -falias option.

For more complete information about compiler optimizations, see our Optimization Notice.