Intel® Integrated Performance Primitives

Установка OpenCV 3.0.0-rc1 (с использованием IPP и TBB) на Intel Edison Yocto. USB-камера в OpenCV

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  • ippsMalloc_...(int len)

    what is the parameter 'len' referring to in ippsMalloc_XYZ(int len) function?

    does it refer to "number of bytes", or "number" of elements"?

    using examples on the reference:  https://software.intel.com/en-us/ipp-9.0-ipps-manual-pdf

    page 35:

         Ipp8u* pBuf = ippsMalloc_8u(8*sizeof(Ipp8u));

    seems referring to "number of bytes"

    but the example on page 168:  

    Transpose error

    I use ipp library in my codes(FFTwd, MulC, ie.) and they work right. but I couldnt use ipp transpose functions. I added ipp library and path. I wrote this code from the ipp documents:
    IppStatus transpose_m_32f(void) {
    /* Source matrix with width=4 and height=3 */
    Ipp32f pSrc[3*4] = { 1, 2, 3, 4,
    5, 6, 7, 8,
    9, 0, 1, 2 };

    Alpha composite onto destination without alpha

    I have two cases where I need to do fast composition of images and I can't find a suitable method in IPP.

    In both cases the destination image doesn't have an alpha channel, but I have alpha information for the image I'm trying to composite on top. I don't want to create an alpha channel in the destination image just for this operation because the ROI might be very small.

    So my use cases are:

    Intel® Parallel Studio XE 2015 Update 6 Professional Edition for Fortran and C++ Linux*

    Intel® Parallel Studio XE 2015 Update 6 Professional Edition for Fortran and C++ parallel software development suite combines Intel's C/C++ compiler and Fortran compiler; performance and parallel libraries; error checking, code robustness, and performance profiling tools into a single suite offering.  This new product release includes:

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  • Intel® Integrated Performance Primitives
  • Intel® Parallel Studio XE 2015 Update 6 Professional Edition for C++ Linux*

    Intel® Parallel Studio XE 2015 Update 6 Professional Edition for C++ parallel software development suite combines Intel's C/C++ compiler; performance and parallel libraries; error checking, code robustness, and performance profiling tools into a single suite offering.  This new product release includes:

  • Linux*
  • C/C++
  • Intel® Parallel Studio XE Composer Edition
  • Intel® Parallel Studio XE Professional Edition
  • Intel® VTune™ Amplifier
  • Intel® C++ Compiler
  • Intel® Inspector
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  • problems with ippiMalloc_8u_C4()

    I am having all sorts of pain chasing down a bug that crashes my app when exiting, that is, when I call all of the destructors and exit. Using gdb, I have noticed something that seems strange to me.   When I first call ippiMalloc_8u_C4() I get a very large/high pointer, but subsequent calls return much lower memory.  For example, my log will look like this:

    Dec 08 16:04:29.038  ***: ippiMalloc() returning ptr: 0x7f6a09347040 
    Dec 08 16:04:29.053  ***: ippiMalloc() returning ptr: 0x2e8f9c0 
    Dec 08 16:04:29.057  ***: ippiMalloc() returning ptr: 0x269ed80 

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