Game Development

Do-it-yourself Game Task Scheduling

Intel® Threading Building Blocks (Intel® TBB) is used to efficiently spread work over threads. Nulstein, as described in this article, is a simple and memory effective method for implementing task scheduling that can be adapted to most game platforms.
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  • Intel® Threading Building Blocks
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  • Performance per Watt: Hey, I already know it’s important, don’t I? (The intro, part I)

    What is performance per Watt?

    Performance per Watt is pretty straight forward when you first look at it. Then you begin to sink in the quicksand you’ve blithely walked into. The panic sets in as you sink lower and lower. Eventually you decide to ignore the whole complicated mess and go back to saying to yourself how straight forward it is. Of course, deep within your heart of hearts, you know that it’s not.

    For most of us, performance per Watt is nothing more than how much our computer can get done on a given battery charge.

    Visualize this! Using Intel Parallel Studios in Game development

    Hello and welcome to another episode of Visualize this! where we talk about topics relating to Visual Computing. I am Arti Gupta, community manager for Games Development on the Intel Software Network.

    Our guest today is Paul Lindberg, software engineer at Intel. Paul will talk to us about the features of Intel Parallel Studios and how game developers can benefit from this tool.


    Visualize this! Dreamworks and Intel optimization process

    Hello and welcome to another episode of Visualize this! where we talk about topics relating to Visual Computing. I am Arti Gupta, community manager for Games Development on the Intel Software Network.

    Our guest today is Charles Congdon. Charles will talk to us about how Dreamworks and Intel have teamed to do optimization and re-architecture work.



    Download link to a high quality MP4 video file of the show (about 150MB)

    GPA 2.1 Feature Highlight: Supports all DX devices

    For this week's GPA blog entry, I wanted to make sure that everyone is aware that GPA runs across all DX devices. This means that GPA supports all Intel DX devices as well as any and all non-Intel DX devices. Further, all GPA features work equally across all these platforms. This includes our shader duration metrics per draw call.

    GPA 2.1 Feature Highlight: Configurable X and Y Axes in the Bar Chart

    In 2.1, GPA allows you to configure both the X and Y axis to any available metric within the bar chart. This allows you to visually see the relationship between multiple per-draw call metrics at the same time. For example, you can select vertex shader duration in the X-axis and pixel shader duration in the Y-axis.


    After configuring the bar chart this way, the wider the bar is - the more vertex shader heavy it is, the taller, the more pixel shader heavy it is.


    See the screenshots below for a view of this feature in action...

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