Guide to Intel Statement of Work and Development Completion Report

 

Welcome to the Intel® Enterprise Performance Enabling project for Virtualization.  By working with Intel to complete the tasks outlined in the Development Completion Report (DCR), you will have an easy path to get your software “virtualization-ready”.  You can take advantage of Intel® software partner program sales and marketing benefits. 

This document provides some important notes on how to complete DCR. 

Select Virtual Machine Monitor (VMM) Software

You need to select Virtual Machine Monitor (VMM) software.   There are many VMM vendors that you can choose.  The following is a list of major VMM vendors and their products.

 

When you select a VMM, please pay attention to the following factors. 

Performance

All Virtual Machine Monitors are not equal in term of performance, and the application overhead running in VMM varies as well. The following chart gives you an example of the overheads of different type of applications (Java, Database, Web, ERP, and CRM) running in two different major VMMs. 

As a general rule of thumb, hypervisor-based VMMs usually incur less performance overhead than hosted VMMs.  Paravirtualized OSes and drivers usually perform more efficiently than fully virtualized OSes and emulation based drivers.  IO intensive, network intensive, and memory intensive applications incur higher performance penalty running in virtual mode as compared with native mode. 

Functionality

All Virtual Machine Monitors are not equal in term of functionality either.  While all VMM vendors provide basic infrastructure to support virtualizati on, the functionality provided by VMM vendors is quite different.  The more mature VMMs may have a richer set of features that may benefit some environments.  Live migration capability, support for virtual SMP and a large number of virtual CPUs, etc. are examples.  Please check the vendor’s web site for the features that the product supports.

Cost

To compete in the market place, VMM vendors have different strategies, value propositions and hence different pricing schemes: some charge at premium pricing, some charge at discount, and others are free.  You need to select a VMM that fits your budget.  Some vendors have a stripped down free version of their high end premium product that serves as a teaser, enticing customers to engage virtualization, with the hope they will purchase the full version. 

Virtualization Environment and Expertise

Consider the type of operating systems that you would consolidate.  Are those homogeneous (e.g. same OSes) or heterogeneous (e.g. different type of OSes)?  For example, if you want to consolidate heterogeneous OSes, the OS container approach to virtualization will not be a feasible solution since it requires the same operating system for all consolidated applications.  And, you also need to look into the expertise of you IT staff.  If your IT staff is not family with Linux, they probably would have a steeper learning curve on using a Linux kernel based VMM than hosted VMM, although hosted VMM may have higher overhead.   

Select Computer Platforms

After you have selected VMM software, you need to select computer hardware for installing the VMM and your software application.  We recommend Intel® Quad-Core Xeon™ based Expandable (EX), Efficient Performance (EP), and Entry (EN) platforms,   which all have hardware assisted virtualization - Intel® Virtualization Technology built in. 

Selecting Intel® Xeon™ 7300 series (EX) for large scale server consolidation will result in the lowest server count.   High performance database, memory & I/O intensive applications usually run on this platform.  If your application ran on 4 processors in native mode, or if the virtualization environment requires more than 24GB memory, or when server reliability is critical, then use the four socket Intel® Xeon™ 7300 series. 

Or, select the Intel® Xeon™ 5300 series (EP) for mainstream infrastructure Virtualization.  2 socket licensing and excellent price/performance/watt makes this an ideal server for most ISV Virtualization projects. 

And, select the Intel® Xeon™ 3000 series (EN) for cost-effective Virtualization if you are under a tight budget.  The following lists the machine configuration with memory and OS are recommended.

Intel® Xeon®™ 7300 Series Configuration:
Processor: Four Quad-Core Intel Xeon processors X7350 2.93GHz, 1066 MHz system bus, 8MB L2 cache,
Chipset: Intel® 7300 Chipset (Clarksboro)
Memory: 64GB memory FBD PC2-5300F
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 2003 Enterprise Edition, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4 Advanced Server, SUSE LINUX Enterprise Server 10

Intel® Xeon®™ 5300 Series Configuration:
Processor: Two Quad-Core Intel Xeon processors X5365 3.0 GHz, 1333 MHz system bus, 2x4MB L2 Cache
Chipset: Intel® 5000P Chipset (Blackford)
Memory: 32GB DDR2-RAM
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 2003 Enterprise Edition, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4 Advanced Server, SUSE LINUX Enterprise Server 10

Intel® Xeon®™ Processor 3000 Sequence Configuration:
Processor: Quad-Core Intel Xeon processor X3220 (2.40 GHz, 8 MB L2 cache, 1066 MHz bus)
Chipset: Intel® 5000P Chipset (Blackford)
Memory: 16GB ECC 667MHz DDR2 SDRAM
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 2003 Enterprise Edition, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4 Advanced Server, SUSE LINUX Enterprise Server 10  

Implement Virtualization Use Cases

After you have selected the VMM and computer hardware, you need to implement one or more of the following use cases.  Select one of the performance metrics that was outlined in the DCR.  Keep in mind that you must publish your application’s performance in the “native” (non virtualized) mode and the “virtualized” mode.

Application Virtualization

You need to run the application in a virtualized environment using one virtual machine and publish the application performance data.  Run your application in the virtual mode with a similarly configured system as in the native mode: the number of Virtual CPUs equals to physical CPUs and virtual memory equals to physical memory. 

Application Scaling

Instead of scaling out to multiple physical servers, you replicate the application to more than one virtual machine in a virtualized server to achieve performance scaling.  Treat virtual machines as physical machines when you configure your application cluster.    

Tier Consolidation

Consolidate application components running on separate physical systems into multiple virtual machines running on fewer physical systems and publish the application performance data. For example, map an application’s web/ application and database server components running separately on two or more physical systems (2-3 tiers) to two or more separate virtual machines running on a single physical system (1 tier).   You need to treat virtual machines as physical machines when you configure your application suite. 

Para obtener información más completa sobre las optimizaciones del compilador, consulte nuestro Aviso de optimización.
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