Intel Academic Community at IPDPS 2011

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25th IEEE International Parallel & Distributed Processing Symposium

Intel Platinum Patron Night was a fantastic event, with a packed room of 170 attendees passionate about parallel programming in education. Watch the videos from Intel Platinum Patron Night to learn about using games to teach parallelism to undergraduates, recent innovations in design patterns, and hiring at Intel!

 

Opening Remarks

Rowena Turner (Intel Corporation)

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Design Patterns in Practice and Teaching

Michael Wrinn (Intel Corporation

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How to Use Games to Teach Parallelism to Undergraduates

Ashish Amresh (Arizona State University at Polytechnic Campus)

Amit Jindal (Intel Corporation)

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Choosing a Future Career at Intel Corporation

Dani Napier (Intel Corporation)

Lauren Dankiewicz (Intel Corporation)

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The Intel Academic Community and NSF are supporting the IEEE Computer Society Technical Committee on Parallel Processing (NSF/TCPP). NSF/TCPP is working to create a core curriculum for CS/CE undergraduates for parallel and distributed computing (PDC). The 1st workshop invited proposals from academia, industry, and other educational and research institutes to present on teaching PDC topics in undergraduate Computer Science and Engineering curriculum. Topics included: 1. Pedagogical issues in PDC 2. Novel ways of teaching PDC topics 3. Models for incorporating PDC topics in core CS/CE curriculum 4. Experience with incorporating PDC topics into core CS/CE courses.

The Challenge of Teaching Program Performance Tuning

David Padua (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign)

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NSF/TCPP Curriculum Report and Panel Discussion

Coordinator: Sushil Prasad (Georgia State)

Committee members and Panelists: Chtchelkanova, Almadena (NSF), Das, Sajal (University of Texas at Arlington, NSF), Das, Chita (Penn State, NSF), Dehne, Frank (Carleton University, Canada), Gouda, Mohamed (University of Texas, Austin, NSF), Gupta, Anshul (IBM T.J. Watson Research Center), Jaja, Joseph (University of Maryland), Kant, Krishna (NSF, Intel), La Salle, Anita (NSF), LeBlanc, Richard (Seattle University), Lumsdaine, Andrew (Indiana University), Padua, David (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), Parashar, Manish (Rutgers, NSF), Patt, Yale (UT Austin), Prasad, Sushil (Georgia State University), Prasanna, Viktor (University of Southern California), Robert, Yves (INRIA, France), Rosenberg, Arnold (Colorado State University), Sahni, Sartaj (University of Florida), Shirazi, Behrooz (Washington State University), Sussman, Alan (University of Maryland), Weems, Chip (University of Massachusetts), and Wu, Jie (Temple University)

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Integrating Parallel and Distributed Computing Into Undergraduate Courses at All Levels

Steven Bogaerts (Wittenberg University), Kyle Burke (Wittenberg University) and Eric Stahlberg (National Cancer Institute)

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Experiences of an Undergraduate Parallel Computing Course

Bo Hong (Georgia Tech)

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Early Adopter: Integrating Concepts from Parallel and Distributed Computing into the Undergraduate Curriculum

Eileen Kraemer (University of Georgia)

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Integration of Parallel Topics in the Undergraduate Curriculum, 2011

Joel Adams (Calvin College)

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ASU and Intel Collaboration in Parallel and Distributed Computation

Violet Syrotiuk, Yinong Chen, Eric Kostelich, Yann-Hang Lee, Alex Mahalov and Gil Speyer (Arizona State)

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Parallel Computing: Keys to a Future in Computing

Stephen Providence (Hampton University)

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Using Games to Teach Parallelism to Computer Science 2nd year and 3rd Year College Students

Deepak Vembar and Amit Jindal (Intel)

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Teaching Parallel and Distributed Computing at Masaryk University

Jiri Barnat, Lubos Brim and Ivana Cerna (Masaryk University, Czech Republic)

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Parallel Programming in the Computing Curriculum

Ankur Gupta, Rahul Hardikar and Jon Sorenson (Butler University)

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PDC Modules for Every Level: A Comprehensive Model for Incorporating PDC Topics into the Existing Undergraduate Curriculum

Konstantin Laufer, Chandra Sekharan and George K. Thiruvathukal (Loyola University Chicago)

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Teaching Parallel Computing to Lower-Division Undergraduates

Peter Pacheco (University of San Francisco)

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Joint UIUC/UMD Parallel Algorithms/Programming Course

David Padua (Urbana), Uzi Vishkin (Maryland) and Jeffrey Carver (University of Alabama)

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Speaker Biographies and Agenda for Intel Platinum Patron Night

Architecting Parallel Software: Design patterns in practice and teaching

Design patterns can systematically identify reusable elements in software engineering, and have been particularly effective in codifying practice in object-oriented software. A team of researchers centered at UC Berkeley’s Parallel Computing Laboratory continues to investigate a design pattern approach to parallel software; the effort has matured to the point that an undergraduate course was delivered on the topic in Fall 2010. This talk will briefly describe the pattern language itself, then demonstrate its application in examples from both image processing and game design.

Michael Wrinn manages Intel's Innovative Software Education team, which collaborates with universities to bring parallel computing to the mainstream of undergraduate education. His prior assignments include managing Intel's software engineering lab in Shanghai, and directing the human interface technology research. He was Intel's representative to the committee which produced the first OpenMP specification, and remains active in the parallel computing community. Before joining Intel, Michael worked at Accelrys (San Diego), implementing commercial and research simulation codes on a wide variety of parallel/HPC systems. He holds a Ph.D. (in quantum mechanics) and a B.Sc.(math/chemistry/physics) from McGill University.

Teaching Parallelism Using Games


Academic institutions do not have to spend expensive multi-core hardware to support game-based courses to teach parallelism.   We will discuss what teaching methodologies educators can use for integrating parallel computing curriculum inside a game engine. We will talk about the full game development process, from game design to game engineering and how parallelism is critical.   We will show five game demos that mirror current trends in the industry and how educators can use in these games in the classroom. We will also show the learning outcomes, what parallelism topics are appropriate to teach students at various levels.  We will demonstrate how to take games running serially and modify them to run parallel.


Ashish Amresh leads the Computer Gaming curriculum initiatives at the School of Computing and Informatics at Arizona State University. He completed his MS in computer science from ASU in 2000, then worked in the video game industry as a graphics engineer programmer, and returned to ASU to work on his doctorate in computer science. While working on his doctoral degree, Amresh led the efforts in building the prototype that eventually resulted in the launching of the Decision Theatre at ASU in May 2005. In the same year he was awarded the Graduate College Teaching Excellence Award.

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An Intel veteran of 11 years, Amit Jindal is a Performance Lead at Intel's Digital Home Group, enabling high-performance of Intel-powered Smart TVs. Prior to this role, Amit was involved with performance optimization of large-scale enterprise applications (primarily SAP). Amit started his career at Intel in 2000 as an automation engineer developing, simulating, and optimizing performance of automation in Intel factories. Amit has been a threading/ parallelism evangelist since 2005, teaching courses for Intel Academic Program, serving as panelist in academic conferences, and working with Universities in setting their curriculums. Amit holds an MBA Degree in Global Management, and MS Degree in Computer Science.

Choosing a Future Career at Intel

Intel's Dani Napier will introduce why Intel is a great place to work-- it's challenging, has great benefits and is abundant with rewarding growth opportunities. She will expand on why parallelism is crucial to Intel's growth strategy and give an overview of the various types of jobs in which knowledge of parallel and distributed processing apply at Intel. Finally, Dani will explain the new hire development process and why Intel is the company that will help you become successful in your desired career path. Lauren Dankiewicz will discuss the recruiting process and how to approach finding a job that is the right fit for you!

Hi, there! My name is Dani. I've been with Intel for almost 14 years, mostly in Chandler, Arizona. I started out as an intern in New Mexico's fabs. Then I was hired into a full-time job and have held a variety of engineering and business roles ever since.
When I first started as an Intel engineer I wished I had done three things: 1) I wish I would've taken a couple of business courses 2) I wish I would've taken more stats courses, and 3) I wish I would've learned to give presentations more effectively. All these things I eventually learned at Intel through all the coursework they have in place for employees. I can tell you that in my entire career I have never stopped learning, either from coursework or from brilliant peers.


Lauren Dankiewicz joined Intel in April 2011 as a Recent College Graduate (RCG). At Intel, she is a marketing manager in the Academic Community. Lauren graduated from University of California, Berkeley in 2009 with a B.A. in Chinese Language (Mandarin) and B.S. in Business Administration. She is now pursuing a Master's degree in Computer Science.

 



Using Games to Teach Parallelism to Undergraduates-
Presentation at the NSF/TCPP Workshop on Parallel and Distributed Computing Education (EduPar-11)

The Visual Computing Software Enabling (VCSE) group at Intel has developed some exciting game demos that are ideal for teaching the basic tenets of parallelism, including data and task decomposition, scheduling techniques, and software architecture. These demos are designed for an audience ranging from 2nd to 4th year, while retaining the emphasis on hands-on, laboratory instruction. Intel’s faculty collaborators have liked this approach, as today’s students are familiar with multi-media and rich visualization, and games act as immediately likable and interesting delivery vehicles for learning these important parallelism concepts.

We have two primary objectives: update undergraduate curriculum with a laboratory-based 2nd year course on parallel computation, and introduce some of the parallelism concepts and profiling tools used in the industry. This approach will help students adopt a “think parallel” mentality early and to see the importance of using profiling tools to develop correct and high-performance code for greater effectiveness. Further, we will share methodologies that improve student understanding of the basic principles of parallel computing.

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Deepak Vembar is an Engineer at Intel where he focuses on developing and optimizing graphics and game technologies on Intel hardware. Prior to joining Intel, Deepak was a graduate student at Clemson University and received his Master's and PhD degrees in Computer Science.

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An Intel veteran of 11 years, Amit Jindal is a Performance Lead at Intel's Digital Home Group, enabling high-performance of Intel-powered Smart TVs. Prior to this role, Amit was involved with performance optimization of large-scale enterprise applications (primarily SAP). Amit started his career at Intel in 2000 as an automation engineer developing, simulating, and optimizing performance of automation in Intel factories. Amit has been a threading/ parallelism evangelist since 2005, teaching courses for Intel Academic Program, serving as panelist in academic conferences, and working with Universities in setting their curriculums. Amit holds an MBA Degree in Global Management, and MS Degree in Computer Science.

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