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Intel Cluster Ready FAQ: Software vendors (ISVs)

Why should we join the Intel Cluster Ready program?
A: By offering registered Intel Cluster Ready applications, you can provide the confidence that applications will run as they should, right away, on certified clusters. Participating in the program will help you increase application adoption, expand application flexibility, and streamline customer support.
Learn more about the Intel Cluster Ready program

Q: How do we register an application?

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  • Intel Cluster Ready FAQ: General Questions

    Q: What is the Intel® Cluster Ready program?
    A: Working with hardware and software vendors, Intel created the Intel Cluster Ready program to simplify configuring, deployment, validation, and management of high-performance computing (HPC) clusters. Intel Cluster Ready can help drive adoption of HPC while enabling customers to boost productivity and solve new problems. Learn more about the Intel Cluster Ready program for:
     

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  • Intel Cluster Ready FAQ: Hardware vendors, system integrators, platform suppliers

    Q: Why should we join the Intel® Cluster Ready program?
    A: By offering certified Intel Cluster Ready systems and certified components, you can give customers greater confidence in deploying and running HPC systems. Participating in the program will help you drive HPC adoption, expand your customer base, and streamline customer support. You will also gain access to the Intel Cluster Checker software tool and the library of pre-certified Intel Cluster Ready system reference designs.

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  • Intel Cluster Ready FAQ: Customer benefits

    Q: Why should we select a certified Intel Cluster Ready system and registered Intel Cluster Ready applications?
    A: Choosing certified systems and registered applications gives you the confidence that your cluster will work as it should, right away, so you can boost productivity and start solving new problems faster.
    Learn more about what is Intel Cluster Ready and its benefits.

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  • Profiling a complex MPI Application : CESM (Community Earth System Model)

    Hello. 

    CESM is a complex MPI climate model which is a highly parallel application. 

    I am looking for ways to profile CESM runs. The default profiler provides profiling data for only a few routines. I have tried using external profilers like TAU, HPC Toolkit, Allinea Map, ITAC Traceanalyzer and VTune. 

    As I was running CESM across a cluster (with 8 nodes - 16 processors each), it was most beneficial to use HPC Toolkit and Allinea Map for profiling. However, I am keen on finding two metrics for each CESM routine executed.  These are :

    Performance issues of Intel MPI 5.0.2.044 on Windows 7 SP 1 with 2x18 cores cpus.

    Dear support team,

    I have a question about a performance difference between Windows 7 SP 1 and RHEL 6.5.

    The situation is as follows:
    The hardware is a DELL precision rack 7910, see link for exact specification (click on components):
    http://www.dell.com/support/home/us/en/19/product-support/servicetag/3X8GG42/configuration

    need to type "Enter" ?

    Hi, Everyone,

    I am running my hybrid MPI/OpenMP jobs on 3-nodes Infiniband PCs Linux cluster. each node has one MPI process that has 15 OpenMP threads. This means my job runs with 3 MPI processes and each MPI process has 15 threads.

    the hosts.txt file is given as follows:

    coflowrhc4-5:1
    coflowrhc4-6:1
    coflowrhc4-7:1

     I wrote the following batch file as follows:

    /************** batch file******************/

    Intel MPI 5.0.3.048 and I_MPI_EXTRA_FILESYSTEM: How to tell it's on?

    All,

    I hope the Intel MPI experts here can help me out. Intel MPI 5.0.3.048 was recently installed on our cluster, a cluster that uses a GPFS filesystem. Looking at the release notes I saw that "I_MPI_EXTRA_FILESYSTEM_LIST gpfs" was now available. Great! I thought I'd try to see if I can see an effect or not.

    Cannot use jemalloc with IntelMPI

    Hi,

    I've tried to bench several memory allocators on Linux (64-bit) such as ptmalloc2, tcmalloc and jemalloc with an application linked against IntelMPI (4.1.3.049).

    Launching any application linked with jemalloc will cause the execution to abort with a signal 11. But the same application, when not linked with IntelMPI will work without any issue.

    Is IntelMPI doing its own malloc/free ?
    How can this issue be overcome ?

    Thanks,
    Eloi

     

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