Archived

Game Developers Conference 2015

When: Mar 2 - Mar 6
Where: San Francisco, CA, United States
Type: Conference

GDC Talks


Wednesday, March 4th, 2015

South Hall Room 301 – Capacity 195

11:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Getting There First: OpenGL ES* 3.1 and Intel® Extensions in Fractal Combat X*
Jon Kennedy - Intel, Egor Yusov - Intel, Davide Pasca - OYK Games

View the presentation [PDF 3.90MB]

OpenGL ES 3.1 is the latest iteration of OpenGL ES released by the Khronos Group for mobile devices and has recently been extended by Google with the Android* Extension Pack. Together, they extend the standard graphics API with new functionality aimed at bringing desktop-quality rendering to mobile platforms.

Intel was one of the first hardware vendors to fully support the new API in its GPUs, and Fractal Combat X (http://oykgames.com/fractal-combat-x/) was the first OpenGL ES 3.1-powered Android title released to the community. The game leverages the new API in a number of ways including PCF shadow sampling and texture sampling in the vertex shader. Besides OpenGL ES 3.1, the game also exploits several Intel-specific OpenGL ES extensions. Geometry shaders are used for high-quality particle rendering, and hardware tessellation improves terrain geometric resolution and viewing distance.

This joint session by Egor Yusov, Jon Kennedy, and Davide Pasca (lead developer of Fractal Combat X) will cover new functionality exposed in OpenGL ES 3.1, the Android Extension Pack and Intel extensions and how they were used in Fractal Combat X. Davide will also talk about his experience developing for Intel® processor-based platforms, including:

  • Experience with compiler setup for x86 (Intel® SSE2, auto-vectorization, etc.)
  • Experience moving from OpenGL ES 2.0 to OpenGL ES 3.1 (shaders, setup, etc.)
  • Using extensions and their benefits: improved quality and functionality

12:30 PM – 1:30 PM
Fast Forward Session
Various

Join us for a lunchtime series of rapid-fire mini presentations. During the hosted lunch session we will highlight our technical sessions, demos, and other technologies. Each presentation will be 5 minutes long—so hang on, sit tight, and let's see what you learn when you Fast Forward.

2:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Power Efficient Programming: How Funcom Increased Play Time in Lego* Minifigures by 40%.
Sergio de los Santos - Funcom, Antoine Cohade - Intel

View the presentation [PDF 4.23MB]

With the recent gaming changes to mobile platforms from traditional desktops, the relationship between power and performance is tighter than ever. Providing the best user experience in the mobile gaming world means high performance and longer battery life. This session will teach developers practical methods to improve user experience by providing a practical overview of power issues in gaming and show how to boost the end user experience regardless of the platform's power constraints. Attendees will then walk through a practical example by Funcom to create a power saving mode in Lego Minifigures that increased gaming time by more than 40%.

We will show that we can quickly reduce processor power consumption over 50% when optimizing a gaming workload by performing simple modifications such as capping the frame rate, reducing AI threads, changing the rendering resolution, and choosing the right algorithm. Developers will leave the presentation with an increased understanding of key power optimizations to take back and use in their mobile games.

3:30 PM – 4:30 PM
Play faster and longer: How Square Enix maximized Android* performance and battery life with Hitman:Go*
Francis Pétrin – Square-Enix Montreal, Cristiano Ferreira - Intel

View the presentation [PDF 3.94MB]

It’s important for developers to deliver the best possible performance and power efficiency for their Android games. With the addition of native x86 Android support in Unity*, Square Enix was able to take advantage of the new feature with their popular title “Hitman GO”—one of the first games published with x86 Android native support developed with Unity. In this session we will discuss how Hitman GO’s “design by constraints” philosophy allowed the developers to deliver a polished, high-end experience to mobile devices. We will then walk the audience through adding x86 support to a previously ARM*-only project. Finally, we will show how to use Intel® Graphics Performance Analyzers toolset to provide the best possible user experience, ensuring that users on the top tablet silicon achieve the highest power and performance. Developers will come out of this presentation with new insights about the Android ecosystem and tools/techniques to optimize their apps to provide a better experience on all levels of hardware to reach as many end users as possible.

5:00 PM – 6:00 PM
How to create a high quality, fast texture compressor using ISPC
Marc Fauconneau Dufresne - Intel

View the presentation [PDF 6.37MB]

Due to demand, we have been looking into effective compression of the new DirectX* 11 texture formats (BC7, BC6H). This led us to publish a highly efficient ISPC-based texture compressor, under a permissive license, that has now been integrated into several content pipelines. We’ll present how these formats work, why you want to use them, and how our implementation is an improvement over previous software (including some running on discrete GPUs!). We’ll perform a deep dive into the algorithms that enable us to achieve high efficiency and the way we used ISPC to leverage SIMD processing on a wide array of platforms, then discuss future plans.


Thursday, March 5th, 2015

South Hall Room 301 – Capacity 195

10:00 AM – 11:00 AM
Edge Detection-based Post Processing in Warlords of Draenor*
Matthew M. Williams - Blizzard Entertainment, John Hartwig - Intel

View the presentation [PDF 7.76MB]

In this Session, we will present three new post-processing techniques added to the Warlords of Draenor expansion to World of Warcraft*. We will look at how we integrated Conservative Morphological Anti-Aliasing (CMAA) and the extensions required to Warcraft’s post-processing pipeline, some of the problems faced, and the solutions under investigation. The session will also look at the evolution of the Character and Quest object Outlining technique from its Diablo* 3 origins to its implementation in World of Warcraft. The third technique is the sketch shader. Inspired by the opening cinematic in Diablo 3, this technique provides a real-time pen & ink on a scroll look that is used as an effective storytelling device.

11:30 AM – 12:30 PM
Getting There First: OpenGL ES* 3.1 and Intel® Extensions in Fractal Combat X*
Jon Kennedy - Intel, Egor Yusov - Intel, Davide Pasca - OYK Games

View the presentation [PDF 3.90MB]

OpenGL ES 3.1 is the latest iteration of OpenGL ES released by the Khronos Group for mobile devices and has recently been extended by Google with the Android* Extension Pack. Together, they extend the standard graphics API with new functionality aimed at bringing desktop-quality rendering to mobile platforms.

Intel was one of the first hardware vendors to fully support the new API in its GPUs, and Fractal Combat X (http://oykgames.com/fractal-combat-x/) was the first OpenGL ES 3.1-powered Android title released to the community. The game leverages the new API in a number of ways including PCF shadow sampling and texture sampling in the vertex shader. Besides OpenGL ES 3.1, the game also exploits several Intel-specific OpenGL ES extensions. Geometry shaders are used for high-quality particle rendering, and hardware tessellation improves terrain geometric resolution and viewing distance.

This joint session by Egor Yusov, Jon Kennedy, and Davide Pasca (lead developer of Fractal Combat X) will cover new functionality exposed in OpenGL ES 3.1, the Android Extension Pack, and Intel extensions and how they were used in Fractal Combat X. Davide will also talk about his experience developing for Intel processor-based platform, including:

  • Experience with compiler setup for x86 (Intel® SSE2, auto-vectorization, etc.)
  • Experience moving from OpenGL ES 2.0 to OpenGL ES 3.1 (shaders, setup, etc.)
  • Using extensions and their benefits: improved quality and functionality
  • Specific approach for particles, terrain, and HDR

12:45 PM – 1:45 PM
OIT to Volumetric Shadow Mapping, 101 Uses for Raster-Ordered Views using DirectX* 12
Leigh Davies - Intel

View the presentation [PDF 6.70MB]

One of the new features of DirectX 12 is Raster-Ordered Views. This adds Ordering back into Unordered Access Views, removing race conditions within a pixel shader when multiple in-flight pixels write to the same XY screen coordinates. This allows algorithms that previously required link lists of pixel data to be efficiently processed in bounded memory. The talk shows how everything from Order Independent Transparency to Volumetric shadow mapping and even post processing can benefit from using Raster-Ordered Views to provide efficient and more importantly robust solutions suitable for real-time games. The session uses a mixture of real-world examples of where these algorithms have already been implemented in games and forward-looking research to show some of the exciting possibilities that open up with this new ability coming to DirectX.

4:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Efficient Rendering with DirectX* 12 on Intel® Graphics
Andrew Lauritzen - Intel, Michael Apodaca - Intel

View the presentation [PDF 2.23MB]

DirectX 12 is coming, and it brings significant improvements to the performance and power efficiency of rendering. In this session, attendees will learn how to best exploit these gains on Intel graphics hardware. We will discuss how the new API maps to 4th and 5th generation Intel® Core™ graphics hardware and give examples of how to minimize overhead and maximize efficiency on both the CPU and GPU.