Processeurs Intel® Core™

Using Intel® TSX with VTune(TM) Amplifier XE 2015 Beta to measure transaction time & abort in your code?

When the user develops multithreaded applications, the user should protect critical (sensitive) code area called by threads, so threads access shared memory without data conflict. Most of time, the user might use critical_section, mutex, semaphore, atomic, events, or other “locks” to protect critical code area and let them not re-enterable.

Optimizing Big Data processing with Haswell 256-bit Integer SIMD instructions

Big Data requires processing huge amounts of data. Intel Advanced Vector Extensions 2 (aka AVX2) promoted most Intel AVX 128-bits integer SIMD instruction sets to 256-bits. Intel AVX brought 256-bits floating-point SIMD instructions, but it didn't include 256-bits integer SIMD instructions. Intel AVX2 allows you to operate with the AVX 256-bits wide YMM register for integer data types. In this post, I’ll explain how developers can speedup big data processing with the new 256-bits integer SIMD instructions.

Power Management Policy: You Mean There’s More Than One?

Power management policy has evolved over the years. The earliest policies consisted of little more than some critical temperature sensors and an interrupt routine that attempted (often unsuccessfully) to cleanly shut down the system before something really bad happened.

Power Management: So what is this policy thing?

Unlike a lot of previous recent blogs, this series is about power management in general. At the very end of the series, I’ll write specifically about the Intel® Xeon Phi™ coprocessor.

I have talked incessantly over the years about power states (e.g. P-states and C-states), and how the processor transitions from one state to another. For a list of previous blogs in this series, and well as other related blogs on power and power management, see the article at [List0]. But I have left out an important component of power management, namely the policy.

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