Intel® C++ Compiler 14.0 for Android* - Frequently Asked Questions

  1. What is Intel® C++ Compiler for Android*?
  2. Why should developers use Intel C++ Compiler for Android?
  3. What are the key features?  What's the value to developers?
  4. What's new in this release?
  5. Is Intel trying to persuade developers to use a compiler for Android* apps rather than, say, Dalvik?
  6. Why use C or C++ for mobile apps?
  7. What development host systems can I use?  Can I use the compiler on a Windows system?
  8. What are the system hardware and software requirements?
  9. Can the Intel® C++ Compiler be used to develop apps for Android devices not based on Intel processors?
  10. Can the Intel® C++ Compiler for Android be used to develop apps for Microsoft* Windows*, Apple* OS X* or Linux*-based systems?
  11. How do developers get a copy of Intel® C++ Compiler for Android?
  12. What other products does Intel offer mobile app developers?
  13. Is this the same Intel C++ compiler Intel has been selling for several years?
  14. Where can I find more info?
  1. What is Intel® C++ Compiler for Android*?

    It's a native-code C and C++ compiler, compatible with the GNU* C++ in the Android NDK, which software developers can use to build apps for Android devices based on Intel processors. It benefits from the years of experience Intel has gained by offering compilers for other software development market segments. The current release is version 14.0.
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  2. Why should developers use Intel C++ Compiler for Android?

    Whether they are developing a game, an app that requires motion or touch, or an app that would benefit from a more fluid interface or improved response time, Intel C++ Compiler for Android helps developers improve their application's performance. Improved app performance can also boost device battery-life by completing tasks more quickly. Better performing apps retain users.  And users that are satisfied with an app often recommend it to people they know. Additionally, the GNU C++ source-code compatibility preserves the investment a developer has made in their existing app code-base. Intel C++ Compiler for Android makes it possible for developers to recompile, deliver more app performance than might be possible with another compiler, and move apps to an Intel-based Android platform, expanding their base of opportunity. 
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  3. What are the key features of Intel® C++ Compiler for Android?  What's the value to developers?

    In a word, performance, specifically app performance.  The compiler is also compatible with GNU C++, the compiler in the Android NDK.  This means developers can take their source code and build it with Intel C++ or GNU C++.  This feature can be summarized as source code compatibility.  Another compatibility-related feature is that developers can use familiar Android NDK command-line tools, such as debuggers, during their development.  The familiar tools they've been using still apply.  Call this development-environment compatibility, which is important in maintaining high programmer-productivity.  Intel is also providing Forum-based support for this release of the Intel® C++ Compiler for Android.  The community of developers is open to all and monitored by Intel C++ experts around the world providing on-line support and interaction.  Summing it up:  Performance, compatibility and support. 
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  4. What's new in this release?

    This release now supports app development for Intel-based devices running Android Jelly Bean or KitKat.  Intel C++ Compiler 14.0 for Android features enhancements to the new code-base to deliver improved quality and app performance and support for new Intel® Atom™ and Intel® Core™ processors.  In addition, the compiler now supports integration with the Eclipse IDE that comes with the Android SDK.  This release continues to offer developer host-system options.  Developers can use the Intel C++ Compiler for Android on Windows*, OS X* or Linux host development systems. 
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  5. Is Intel trying to persuade developers to use a compiler for Android* apps rather than, say, Dalvik*?

    No, not at all.  The mobility market segment is big and growing and Intel simply wants to help app developers with a full range of tools that take the best possible advantage of Intel based mobile devices. Developers are also increasingly using HTML5. They have several options, including the Intel® XDK HTML5 development environment. 
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  6. Why use C or C++ for mobile apps?

    In some cases, developers want to use C or C++, because they have existing code and don't want to re-invent the functionality in another language, or because they have a special need, such as performance, or because it's the best way to take advantage of platform features. An example of an app that might benefit from compiled code performance is one in which users expect a more fluid experience. Another is an app that would use less power, and preserve battery-life, if it simply ran faster to get a given job or action done. It might be measured in different ways on mobile devices but, like all computing, performance matters.   
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  7. What development host systems can I use?  Can I use the compiler on a Windows system?

    Windows*,OS X* or a Linux* system can be used as a host system. The Intel C++ Compiler 14.0 for Android is available as separate downloadable, installable packages for these three operating environments.  Each can be used to develop apps targeted for Android devices based on the Intel Architecture.
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  8. What are the system hardware and software requirements?

     

    Host Developer System

    Intel-based Target Device

    Windows* Host Developer System

    Android Jelly Bean or KitKat

    • One of Windows 7, 8, or 8.1, 32- or 64-bit
    • Android* NDK r9, r9b or r9c, 32- or 64-bit, for Windows-hosted development
    • or Android* Open Source Project (AOSP) workspace, or example AOSP workspace for Android 4.3.
    • For Eclipse* support: Android* SDK ADT bundle 32- or 64-bit, 20131030 or 20130917 package)

    OS X* Host Developer System

    • OS X Mountain Lion 10.8 or 10.9
    • Android* NDK r9, r9b or r9c, 32- or 64-bit, for OS X-hosted development
    • or Android* Open Source Project (AOSP) workspace, for example AOSP workspace for Android 4.3.
    • For Eclipse* support: Android* SDK ADT bundle (32- or 64-bit, 20131030 or 20130917 package)

    Linux* Hosted Developer System

    • Ubuntu 12.04 64-bit
    • or Ubuntu 11.04 or later, 32-bit
    • Android* NDK r9, r9b or r9c, 32- or 64-bit, for OS X-hosted development
    • or Android* Open Source Project (AOSP) workspace, for example AOSP workspace for Android 4.3.
    • For Eclipse* support: Android* SDK ADT bundle (32- or 64-bit, 20131030 or 20130917 package)
    • Development of 32-bit apps on a 64-bit Linux host may require optional library components from your Linux distribution (ia32-libs, lib32gcc1, lib32stdc++6, libc6-dev-i386, gcc-multilib)

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  9. Can the Intel® C++ Compiler for Android be used to develop apps for Android devices not based on Intel processors?

    No.  The Intel C++ Compiler for Android produces code that runs only on Android devices that use Intel processors. Intel C++ Compiler for Android is highly compatible with the GNU C++ compiler that is part of the Android NDK. This means developers can write a single set of C++ source code and use the appropriate compiler to build apps. This preserves the investment developers have in their source code, helps keep productivity high, and simplifies building apps for Android devices based on the Intel Architecture or ARM*. 
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  10. Can the Intel® C++ Compiler for Android be used to develop apps for  Microsoft* Windows*, Apple* OS X* or Linux*-based systems?

    No.  The Intel C++ Compiler for Android produces code that runs only on Android devices that use Intel processors. 
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  11. How do developers get a copy of Intel® C++ Compiler for Android?

    There are two ways.  First, developers can download an evaluation copy, or buy a license by going to the Intel® Developer Zone, then clicking on the "Android" section and selecting Intel C++ Compiler for Android from the overview section.   The named-user license price is $79.95 per host OS.  Evaluation copies are free.  Second, the compiler is offered in the public beta Intel® Integrated Native Developer Experience (Intel® INDE), which offers a collection of tools, information and services for developers of Android apps.  The tools and services in Intel® INDE work with Android SDK and NDK tools.  The compiler itself is a production-release, not beta.
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  12. What other products does Intel offer mobile app developers?

    Other products include the Intel® XDK for HTML5 which is used by developers creating apps for many mobile platforms.  Intel® Integrated Native Developer Experience (Intel® INDE) is also available in Beta form.  It offers a collection of tools, information and services for Android app developers. 

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  13. Is this the same Intel C++ compiler Intel has been selling for several years?

    Intel C++ Compiler for Android shares a common base, and heritage, with other Intel C++ compilers – a heritage that focuses on performance, compatibility and support.  The Intel® C++ Compiler for Android is based on the Intel14.0 code-base and supports the latest Intel® Core™ and Intel® Atom™ processors. It shares many similar features of other Intel C++ compilers because this is a requirement for mobile computing. Licensing and packaging can vary from market segment to market segment but Intel's goal is to offer a range of C++ compilers that are largely the same to enable use over a range of computing solutions.
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  14. Where can I find more info?

    Here is a list of URLs that provide more information:

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